Poverty journal | Page 8 | CPAG

Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. To contact the Editor, Josephine Tucker, please email: jtucker@cpag.org.uk 

 

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Editorial: Poverty cannot be reduced to a one-dimensional caricature

Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
As the consultation on the government’s latest three-year child poverty consultation closes, it seeks to articulate the policies it sees as reducing poverty, even as it prevaricates over how to define it.

How can we reduce child poverty without improving its prevention?

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
The need to prevent child poverty is often acknowledged, but it is astonishing how quickly we slip away into being ‘realistic’ about what can be done now.

The real reason for the misery of work assessments

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
Many sick and disabled people, including those with Huntington’s Disease, uncontrolled epilepsy, kidney failure or brittle bone disease, are refused employment and support allowance.

Interview: Alan Milburn

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
The Child Poverty Act 2010 requires the government to produce a strategy every three years, setting out the action it plans to take to end child poverty in the UK. Alongside this, the Act established an independent Child Poverty and Social Mobility Commission.

Editorial: child poverty strategy must tackle current headwinds

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
As Poverty goes to press, we have not yet had sight of the government’s next three-year child poverty strategy that it is obliged to produce under the terms of the Child Poverty Act 2010.

Tackling public attitudes

Issue 146 (Autumn 2013)
Making the case for a decent welfare state has become difficult. Much of the media takes every opportunity to cry ‘scrounger’. Each case of fraud gets extensive coverage. It has become a hot party political issue.

Reframing poverty

Issue 146 (Autumn 2013)
The Webb Memorial Trust is hoping to reframe the debate about poverty. Here, Barry Knight explains why and discusses some early results.

Public attitudes to child poverty

Issue 146 (Autumn 2013)
During the recent economic downturn, we have seen public attitudes towards benefit recipients harden. But are attitudes towards child poverty behaving in a similar manner or is the public becoming more sympathetic?

Editorial: we must win the battle of attitudes

Issue 146 (Autumn 2013)
What do the benefit cap, tougher conditionality for claimants and means testing child benefit all have in common? They all hit families with children hard. And they will all drive up child poverty in the next five years and beyond.

Poverty minus a pound: how the poverty consensus unravelled

Issue 145 (Summer 2013)
In 2010, a political consensus seemed to have emerged – that poverty was relative, too high, and needed to be tackled with preventative measures as well as by raising people’s incomes.