Child poverty statistics | CPAG

Child poverty statistics

Three points to bear in mind when you talk about preventing poverty

05 July 2019
CPAG was founded more than fifty years ago to bring the facts of family poverty to government and public knowledge and to press for reform. The devastating report (2018) by Professor Philip Alston, the UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, shows how government withdrawal of responsibility and resources during the past decade has led to more families being pushed into poverty, and relief work by NGOs to alleviate poverty is not enough to compensate sufficiently.

All Kids Count: The impact of the two-child limit after two years

26 June 2019
CPAG, the Church of England, Women's Aid, Turn2Us and the Refugee Council have published a new report looking at the impact of the two-child limit. An estimated 160,000 families have already been affected by the two-child limit to date; the majority are working families and the majority have just three children. More than 800,000 families and three million children could eventually be affected by it, while a third of all children will be affected in many constituencies across the country.

Universal credit: what needs to change

05 June 2019
Universal credit: what needs to change to reduce child poverty and make it fit for families? calls for design and funding changes to improve claimants’ experience of universal credit and to reduce child poverty.

CPAG response to UN Rapporteur's report

22 May 2019
Responding to today’s report from the UN Special Rapporteur on Poverty, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham said: “The UN Rapporteur has exposed the Government’s refusal to acknowledge the scale of child poverty in the UK. By shining an independent light on poverty in the UK, he observed the poor living conditions of children and their families that are seen every day in schools, playgrounds and doctors’ surgeries."

Tackling Child Poverty in Schools: a role for school librarians?

12 April 2019
Child poverty in the UK is rising. The Institute for Fiscal Studies projects that child poverty will rise from the current level of 4.1 million to 5.2 million by 2021/22. This is largely due to cuts in the social security system that many children and families rely on. At the same time, other public services have seen significant cutbacks, which can leave families struggling on low incomes with little support.

Learning to be poor? Poverty and the Troubled Families Programme

10 April 2019
Last month the government published the latest Households Below Average Income (HBAI) statistics, which showed that around 4.1 million children are living in relative poverty.

Two-child limit will tip 300,000 more children into poverty – new research for the policy’s two-year anniversary today

06 April 2019
On today’s two-year anniversary of the two-child limit, new research for the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) shows 300,000 more children will be in poverty as a result of the policy by the time universal credit is fully rolled out in 2023-2024 (1). The policy, which restricts child allowances in universal credit and tax credits to the first two children in a family, has so far hit an estimated 150,000 families with children aged under two.

Child poverty in working families on the rise

28 March 2019
Today’s publication of annual poverty statistics (Households Below Average Income) found: number of poor children in working families up from 67% to 70%; 53% of poor children are aged under 5 (up from 51%) - that’s more than 2 million children.

The new face of child poverty

28 March 2019
Every March the government releases raw data on poverty – called Households Below Average Income. Presented without government spin, we can look at the numerous tables and work out what these numbers – which look so benign on a spreadsheet – mean for actual children. Children growing up worried about money, missing out on things other kids take for granted, and taking the effects of poverty with them into adulthood. What can we learn from the stats this year?

Improving Children's Life Chances

£15.00
This book brings together leading voices from academia and practice to discuss whether the government's new life chances agenda is meaningful.