Articles | CPAG

Articles

Editorial: Poverty 160

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
New poverty figures show that child poverty has risen for the third year in a row, to 4.1 million (after housing costs). And analysis by the University of York shows that families in poverty are now more than £60 a week below the poverty line on average, compared with just over £50 10 years ago.

Editorial: Poverty 157

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Under David Cameron we saw child poverty targets scrapped and poverty reframed as a matter not of lack of money but of poor ‘life chances’, while the number of children in poverty increased. Theresa May promised to address the ‘burning injustices’ in society, including poverty, but has continued to pursue policies which are projected to drive child poverty up to over 5 million by the end of this parliament.

The cost of children

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
Families with children face a particular set of poverty risks. As children come into their lives, parents have a duty to care for them, something which takes time and which thus reduces the hours available to undertake paid work.

Child support: a forgotten resource for low-income families?

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
It is clear that the government intends to do little to increase the cash incomes of poor families with dependent children. Most poor families are set to get less and less over the next four years.

Campaigning on child poverty: the New Zealand experience

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
New Zealand is traditionally regarded as a quiet, safe, egalitarian country with nothing in it more dangerous than a few hobbits. The reality, however, is that between the mid-1980s and the mid-2000s, it experienced the biggest increase in the gap between the rich and the rest of any developed country.

Editorial: Poverty 153

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
In this edition of Poverty we are delighted to feature an edited transcript of the rousing speech delivered by Gordon Brown for CPAG’s 50th Anniversary Lecture in November.

Hard work: parental employment in London

Issue 152 (Autumn 2015)
London has the highest rates of child poverty in the country, with 37 per cent of children growing up in poverty. While the drivers of poverty are always complex, there has long been a recognition that London’s lower parental employment rates play a significant role in driving these high rates of child poverty.

Editorial: Poverty 151

Issue 151 (Summer 2015)
As the election recedes into the distance, the new government is setting about implementing its agenda, with the Queen’s Speech delivered and first Budget of this parliament scheduled for early July. The agenda feels a familiar one.

Low income, high costs: making ends meet inside and outside London

Issue 151 (Summer 2015)
The idea of a poverty line suggests a level of income below which households suffer because they do not have enough to live on.

A divided Britain

Issue 151 (Summer 2015)
Britain has a poor record on poverty. While overall wealth in Britain has doubled over the last three decades, child poverty today is much higher than it was a generation ago and much higher than in most other rich countries.