Articles | CPAG

Articles

An offer you can’t refuse?

Issue 273 (December 2019)
Martin Williams considers the DWP practice of making ‘offers’ in personal independence payment (PIP) appeals.

Appeals and DWP delays

Issue 271 (August 2019)
Advisers are reporting delays in receiving DWP submissions. Ed Pybus looks into the issue.

Fair comment?

Issue 264 (June 2018)
Simon Osborne describes recent caselaw setting out concern at some official responses in appeals to the First-tier Tribunal.

ESA/UC: appeals and previous medical reports

Issue 261 (December 2017)
Simon Osborne reviews recent caselaw and guidance concerning when a tribunal considering an appeal about the work capability assessment should call for the previous medical report.

Scepticism and scrutiny in HMRC appeals

Issue 261 (December 2017)
Ros White considers a recent judgment warning to First-tier Tribunals not to take HMRC submissions at face value.

Appeal rights and mandatory reconsideration

Issue 260 (October 2017)
Ros White considers CPAG’s recent test case success in the Upper Tribunal.

PIP – changing an ongoing award

Issue 258 (June 2017)
When can the DWP change an ongoing award of personal independence payment (PIP), including where the award was made by a tribunal? Ed Pybus looks at the rules and some recent caselaw.

Late is better than never

Issue 253 (August 2016)
A three-judge panel of the Upper Tribunal has overturned a previous ruling that tax credits claimants could not make a late appeal against decisions made between 2008 and 2014. Mike Spencer considers the implications of the decision and how claimants whose appeals were wrongly struck out can get their appeals reinstated.

Tribunals, telephones and videos

Issue 252 (June 2016)
When should a First-tier Tribunal consider allowing appellants to take part in the hearing of their appeals via a telephone or video link? Simon Osborne reviews the relevant law, and some yet wider considerations.

In the bag? Tribunals and less favourable decisions

Issue 247 (August 2015)
Simon Osborne reviews some recent guidance offered in the caselaw about the ability of tribunals to make decisions more adverse to the appellant than the one under appeal.