Articles | CPAG

Articles

‘You can’t live on thin air’: the wait for universal support

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
The impact of the transition to universal credit is only just beginning to be felt. By the end of 2018, all job centres across the UK will be processing claimants in the new system, and by 2022 all existing eligible claimants still on the legacy benefits will have been migrated to the new system – 12 million households.

Editorial: Poverty 160

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
New poverty figures show that child poverty has risen for the third year in a row, to 4.1 million (after housing costs). And analysis by the University of York shows that families in poverty are now more than £60 a week below the poverty line on average, compared with just over £50 10 years ago.

The impact of welfare reform on housing security

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
Welfare reforms underway since 2010 will reduce social security spending by £27 billion a year by 2021, and reach into most aspects of financial support for working-age adults and children.

Editorial: Poverty 159

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The appointment of the new Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Esther McVey, has caused a stir, especially coming shortly after her predecessor had shown some willingness to address universal credit design problems.

Implementing universal credit

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The implementation of universal credit has been beset with problems. Here, Ros White considers the effect on claimants of the delays to the universal credit roll-out and the government’s failure to fully address the complexities involved.

Interview: Paul Gray

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) is an independent, non-partisan, statutory body of experts, set up in 1980 to advise the Secretary of State on secondary legislation and to scrutinise how social security policy will be implemented.

The austerity generation: the impact of cuts to universal credit on family incomes and child poverty

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
CPAG’s new report, The Austerity Generation, sets out the effect of a decade of cuts to social security on family incomes and child poverty, based on modelling by the Institute for Public Policy Research.

Editorial: Poverty 155

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
A lot has happened since the last issue of Poverty hit your desks. A new prime minister, new ministerial teams, and Brexit on the horizon. We have had only some indications of the direction the new government intends to take.

Child support: a forgotten resource for low-income families?

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
It is clear that the government intends to do little to increase the cash incomes of poor families with dependent children. Most poor families are set to get less and less over the next four years.

10 years of austerity: the impact on low-income households and women

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
Tax changes and cuts to public spending and social security have been key to the deficit-reduction strategy implemented by the coalition government between 2010 and 2015 and continued by the Conservative government elected in May 2015.