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Articles

25 years on: reflections on social justice

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Since she took office, Theresa May has adopted the language of ‘social justice’, promising to end the ‘burning injustice’ that some are born into lives of more opportunity than others, because of poverty, race, gender or class. There have been promises of a green paper, setting out her reform agenda. ‘Social justice’ has been high on the agenda before.

‘Loud and clear’ no more: the shift from child poverty to ‘troubled families’

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
The legally binding commitment to eradicate child poverty, once agreed upon by all our main political parties, no longer exists. Instead, the social policy focus at the current time is on ‘troubled’ and ‘workless’ families. Stephen Crossley examines the shifts that have taken place in recent years, highlighting some causes for concern.

Editorial: Poverty 157

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Under David Cameron we saw child poverty targets scrapped and poverty reframed as a matter not of lack of money but of poor ‘life chances’, while the number of children in poverty increased. Theresa May promised to address the ‘burning injustices’ in society, including poverty, but has continued to pursue policies which are projected to drive child poverty up to over 5 million by the end of this parliament.

CPAG: then, now and in the future

Issue 150 (Winter 2015)
As we approach another general election, Moussa Haddad considers the programme that must be put in place in order to eradicate child poverty by the end of the new government’s term in 2020.

The ‘un-politics’ of child poverty

Issue 149 (Autumn 2014)
In recent years there has been a great deal of political activity directed towards the goal of ‘eradicating’ child poverty in the UK. The Child Poverty Act enshrines this goal in law, two child poverty strategies have been published and, at times, a great deal of progress has been made.

Editorial: Poverty cannot be reduced to a one-dimensional caricature

Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
As the consultation on the government’s latest three-year child poverty consultation closes, it seeks to articulate the policies it sees as reducing poverty, even as it prevaricates over how to define it.

How can we reduce child poverty without improving its prevention?

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
The need to prevent child poverty is often acknowledged, but it is astonishing how quickly we slip away into being ‘realistic’ about what can be done now.

Interview: Alan Milburn

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
The Child Poverty Act 2010 requires the government to produce a strategy every three years, setting out the action it plans to take to end child poverty in the UK. Alongside this, the Act established an independent Child Poverty and Social Mobility Commission.

Editorial: child poverty strategy must tackle current headwinds

Issue 147 (Winter 2014)
As Poverty goes to press, we have not yet had sight of the government’s next three-year child poverty strategy that it is obliged to produce under the terms of the Child Poverty Act 2010.

Ending child poverty: a right or a responsibility?

Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
This year the European Union will publish its Recommendation on Child Poverty. This is expected to be based on three ‘pillars’ – access to adequate resources, access to services and opportunities, and children’s participation – and to argue for a strong rights-based approach to eradicating child poverty.