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Welfare reform

Parents on minimum wage cannot meet basic family costs

22 September 2016
Parents working on the ‘national living wage’ still can’t earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum living standard for their children despite flat (and now falling) inflation and a drop in core household costs like food and energy – even if they both work full-time, warns a new report.

"It’s like a game of chess" – interview with our Legal Officer Mike Spencer

05 September 2016
Our Legal Officer Mike Spencer has headed off to a secondment at the Supreme Court, so we caught up with him before he went on the highs and lows of fighting CPAG’s legal battles on behalf of children in poverty.

Still too poor to pay: three years of localised council tax support in London

01 September 2016
Read the latest report from CPAG and Z2K in a series that examines how London council tax support schemes have changed in the last three years and analyses the impact these changes have had on claimants.

London sees 51% surge in use of bailiffs for council tax debts

01 September 2016
Over 19,000 low income, sick and disabled Londoners were referred to bailiffs in 2015/16, a 51% increase on the previous year. 26 of 33 London boroughs charge council tax to households previously deemed too poor to pay (up from 24 in 2015/16). Eight London boroughs hiked minimum charges for 2016/17 (up from 7 in 2015/16).

Still too poor to pay: three years of localised council tax support in London

31 August 2016
Read the latest report from CPAG and Z2K in a series that examines how London council tax support schemes have changed in the last three years and analyses the impact these changes have had on claimants.

Promoting fairness? Lowering the benefit cap will push more families into poverty

25 July 2016
This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. The Welfare Reform & Work Act 2016 lowers the cap to £23,000 per annum for families (or £15,410 for single claimants) in London and £20,000 for families (or £13,400 for single claimants) outside of London.

What Brexit could mean for child poverty

22 July 2016
Two weeks ago, while all eyes were elsewhere, the government published the latest UK poverty statistics. They showed that 200,000 more children are in poverty compared to last year.

Response to statement on universal credit

20 July 2016
Responding today to Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green’s announcement of further delays to the roll out of Universal Credit, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “Although we don’t want the government to rush through the roll out of universal credit if it’s not ready as it will eventually involve half the nation’s children, this latest delay does beg the question of whether the benefit is still fit for purpose...

Child support: a forgotten resource for low-income families?

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
It is clear that the government intends to do little to increase the cash incomes of poor families with dependent children. Most poor families are set to get less and less over the next four years.

10 years of austerity: the impact on low-income households and women

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
Tax changes and cuts to public spending and social security have been key to the deficit-reduction strategy implemented by the coalition government between 2010 and 2015 and continued by the Conservative government elected in May 2015.