Sanctions | CPAG

Sanctions

The ‘Other Britain’

12 July 2019
A little over a century ago, the cry among social reformers concerned about the plight of the poor was for a safety net to be stitched together by the state, to catch any of our fellow citizens who were falling into the clutches of destitution. Had those same reformers witnessed what we have picked up during the past six months – from visits to food banks in Poplar, Waterloo, Leicester, Morecambe, Chester, and Glasgow – they would be appalled by the extent of hunger, homelessness, and insecurity afflicting so many families and vulnerable individuals in our country.

A package to restore benefits for children could lift more than 700,000 children out of poverty

05 June 2019
Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) is calling for re-investment in social security support for the UK’s children in a new report detailing the costs of restoring a catalogue of cuts to social security - including sub-inflationary uprating since 2013/14 - and providing a blueprint for making universal credit fit for families.

David Webster (Glasgow University) briefings on benefit sanctions

18 December 2018
Dr David Webster is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow (Urban Studies) at the University of Glasgow.

Submission on benefit sanctions

08 June 2018
CPAG has submitted evidence to the Work and Pensions select committee on benefit sanctions, their impact, and how the regime could be improved. 

UK child poverty gaps increasing again

28 May 2018
There has always been a debate in the world of poverty measurement about whether we should be more concerned about poverty rates (the proportion below a poverty threshold) or poverty gaps (how far people in poverty are below the poverty threshold).

Emergency Use Only: 2017 update

20 December 2017
In November 2014, the Emergency Use Only report broke new ground as the first systematic research into food bank use across the United Kingdom. Over two years on, this report takes the recommendations from Emergency Use Only and, for each, assesses the progress made.

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
We entered this general election campaign with child poverty at 4 million, projected to rise to 5.1 million by the end of the next parliament (assuming it’s a five-year term). The next government must get to grips with the underlying causes of poverty to make sure all children have a great start in life – and the opportunity to thrive. We have set out the practical steps politicians can take after 8 June to tackle child poverty.

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
Today, children are already twice as likely to be poor as pensioners. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, child poverty is set to soar to 5.1 million children by 2022 – a 42 per cent rise over ten years.

Early Warning System report: Universal Credit Full Service Roll Out

26 April 2017