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ESA

Recent WCA caselaw

Issue 239 (April 2014)
Simon Osborne reviews some important recent caselaw about the work capability assessment (WCA).

Benefit during an employment and support allowance dispute

Issue 238 (February 2014)
David Simmons examines the issues and options which arise in relation to the payment of benefit during a dispute about whether a claimant has limited capability for work.

Walking, wheelchairs and the WCA

Issue 237 (December 2013)
Simon Osborne describes a current split in the caselaw on the question of whether someone’s ability to ‘mobilise’ with a manual wheelchair refers only to functional limitations, or to wider personal factors such as the ability to store the chair. The split will hopefully be resolved in a forthcoming decision of a three-judge panel of the Upper Tribunal.

3-year benefit ban hits 120 disabled people under new sanctions regime

06 November 2013
The DWP has today published new data on the use of sanctions for Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA) and Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) claimants. It is the first data that covers new sanctions regimes that commenced for JSA in October 2012, and for ESA in December 2012.

ESA and sanctions – more hard times ahead

Issue 232 (February 2013)
New rules came into effect on 3 December 2012 for employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants who fall foul of the requirement on them to take part in work-related activity or a work-focused interviews. Edward Graham outlines the main features of the new sanctions regime.

WCA changes again

Issue 232 (February 2013)
New rules taking effect from 28 January 2013 make further changes to the work capability assessment (WCA). Simon Osborne describes what has happened.

Whither the WCA?

Issue 230 (October 2012)
Simon Osborne considers prospects for reform and other change to the work capability assessment.

Response to DWP consultation on ceasing production of income-related benefits take-up statistics

02 October 2012
This is CPAG’s response to a DWP consultation gathering views on its proposal to end, or at the very least limit, the production of take-up estimates for six key means-tested benefits