Costs and spending | Page 6 | CPAG

Costs and spending

Is rising child poverty a price worth paying to protect our children?

16 March 2017
Today’s awful figures tells us several things. Child poverty is high. It’s rising – it’s jumped to 4 million. Two thirds of poor children come from working families. But perhaps the main lesson to take away is that we need to call time on the unfathomable Whitehall orthodoxy, driven by George Osborne but still in place under Theresa May, that rising child poverty is a price worth paying to protect our children.

Budget 2017: thin gruel for struggling families

08 March 2017
The Budget used new language but was silent on projected increases in child poverty and left families highly exposed to rising costs, stagnating pay and benefit cuts.

Budget 2017: new language but more thin gruel for struggling families

08 March 2017
Responding to today’s Budget, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “The Budget may have put the next generation first in words, but it was silent on the huge rises in child poverty projected by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (1) over the next five years. Nothing does more to damage the childhoods and life chances of our children than poverty...

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

01 March 2017
Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

01 March 2017
This briefing presents some of the analysis to be published in a forthcoming report assessing the impacts of cuts to benefits from 2010 to 2020.  This briefing focuses on changes to universal credit since it was first legislated in 2012 and their effects on family incomes, work incentives and poverty rates. It also includes the effect of real-terms cuts to child benefit which took place during the same period.

CPAG responds to Prime Minister’s ‘shared society’ speech

09 January 2017
Commenting on the Prime Minister's speech today, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said: "There are nearly 4 million UK children in poverty so the Prime Minister is absolutely right to say Government should commit to a programme of social reform which adds up to more than policies for dysfunctional families or for our very brightest children...

Consultation on exceptions to the two-child limit: CPAG's response

09 December 2016
CPAG has responded to the government's consultation on exceptions to the two child limit for payments of tax credits and universal credit. CPAG is opposed to the policy in its entirety, because it will deny children their entitlement to the support needed to provide a decent standard of living, and is expected to increase child poverty.

Damning proof that the government has no evidence benefits sanctions work

01 December 2016
Read Alison Garnham's blog for the New Statesman.

Damning proof that the government has no evidence benefits sanctions work

01 December 2016
The National Audit Office says the government has failed to measure whether sanctioning benefit claimants represents value for money. Does anyone remember evidence-based policymaking? For the DWP, it appears from today’s National Audit Office (NAO) report on sanctions, it is at best a dim and distant memory.

Child poverty campaigners call for decisive action from Prime Minister to stop welfare reforms further damaging children

30 November 2016