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Childcare

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
Today, children are already twice as likely to be poor as pensioners. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, child poverty is set to soar to 5.1 million children by 2022 – a 42 per cent rise over ten years.

A Blueprint for 2020: The expansion of early learning and childcare in Scotland

31 March 2017

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

01 March 2017
Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

01 March 2017
This briefing presents some of the analysis to be published in a forthcoming report assessing the impacts of cuts to benefits from 2010 to 2020.  This briefing focuses on changes to universal credit since it was first legislated in 2012 and their effects on family incomes, work incentives and poverty rates. It also includes the effect of real-terms cuts to child benefit which took place during the same period.

Response to announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate

31 October 2016
Responding today to the announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “A London Living Wage rate for 2016-17 of £9.75 is a beacon of good news on a pretty grim horizon for the capital's families...

Unfinished business: where next for extended schools?

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
Schools which deliver a range of services beyond their core function of classroom education are known as ‘extended schools’, offering anything from childcare outside basic school hours, to sports and arts activities and adult learning sessions.

Editorial: Poverty 155

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
A lot has happened since the last issue of Poverty hit your desks. A new prime minister, new ministerial teams, and Brexit on the horizon. We have had only some indications of the direction the new government intends to take.

The cost of a child: Theresa May must reverse cuts to family benefits

22 September 2016
The mood around welfare cuts may finally be shifting. The new work and pensions secretary Damian Green has explicitly sought to distance himself from the stance of the past six years by stating that there "will be no new search for cuts in individual welfare benefits".

Parents on minimum wage cannot meet basic family costs

22 September 2016
Parents working on the ‘national living wage’ still can’t earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum living standard for their children despite flat (and now falling) inflation and a drop in core household costs like food and energy – even if they both work full-time, warns a new report.

Cost of a child 2016

21 September 2016
How much does it cost to raise a child in 2016? This annual research from CPAG and Professor Donald Hirsch, Director of the Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University, finds that parents working on the new higher minimum wage still cannot earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum standard of living for their children.