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Child poverty strategies

UN poverty rapporteur's findings are a wake up call

16 November 2018
Responding to the UN Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty’s findings, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “The Rapporteur’s findings should be a wake-up call for government."

UN Special Rapporteur arrives to assess extreme poverty in UK

05 November 2018
Today the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty arrives in the UK for a twelve-day visit. This is an interesting time to arrive in the UK to investigate human rights for those living in extreme poverty.

UN Special Rapporteur arrives to assess extreme poverty in UK

05 November 2018
Today the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty arrives in the UK for a twelve-day visit.

Submission to UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights

13 September 2018
We have submitted evidence to the United Nations special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, who will visit the UK in November.

Policy Seminar for Local Leads

04 July 2018
On the 25th June 2018 Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) in Scotland hosted a policy seminar for local child poverty leads bringing together representatives from nineteen local authorities and six health boards as well as the Scottish Government, COSLA, SPIRU (Scottish Poverty and Inequality Research Unit), NHS Health Scotland and the Improvement Service.

Happy, Healthy Starts

07 March 2018
Latest figures show that child poverty is rising. There are currently 4 million children living in poverty in the UK, and there are projected to be 5.1 million by 2021. While the government doesn’t seem to want to acknowledge this reality, most starkly illustrated by its refusal to discuss the impact of universal credit on child poverty, others are keen to find practical ways to address the problem.

Milburn resignation: CPAG statement

03 December 2017
In response to Alan Milburn’s resignation as Social Mobility Commissioner, Imran Hussain, Director of Policy at Child Poverty Action Group, said: "It's a genuine loss that Alan Milburn is resigning and totally dispiriting that it seems he is doing so because he has lost confidence in the government's willingness and ability to prioritise making society fairer."

25 years on: reflections on social justice

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Since she took office, Theresa May has adopted the language of ‘social justice’, promising to end the ‘burning injustice’ that some are born into lives of more opportunity than others, because of poverty, race, gender or class. There have been promises of a green paper, setting out her reform agenda. ‘Social justice’ has been high on the agenda before.

‘Loud and clear’ no more: the shift from child poverty to ‘troubled families’

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
The legally binding commitment to eradicate child poverty, once agreed upon by all our main political parties, no longer exists. Instead, the social policy focus at the current time is on ‘troubled’ and ‘workless’ families. Stephen Crossley examines the shifts that have taken place in recent years, highlighting some causes for concern.

Editorial: Poverty 157

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Under David Cameron we saw child poverty targets scrapped and poverty reframed as a matter not of lack of money but of poor ‘life chances’, while the number of children in poverty increased. Theresa May promised to address the ‘burning injustices’ in society, including poverty, but has continued to pursue policies which are projected to drive child poverty up to over 5 million by the end of this parliament.