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Child poverty statistics

Child poverty rates in Scotland predicted to reach 20-year high

22 March 2019

UN Rapporteur’s report a ‘wake-up call’ on UK poverty

19 November 2018
When the United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Professor Philip Alston, completed his 10 day visit to the UK on 16 November, he found that the poverty he had observed was unjust and, in his opinion, contrary to British values.

An unfair start in the UK

02 November 2018
Social mobility is often promoted as a solution to perceived inequities in society. Specifically, it is often positioned by politicians as the solution to child poverty – as evidenced by the Social Mobility Commission, which started life as the Child Poverty and Social Mobility Commission but through various iterations has seen ‘child poverty’ removed from its remit entirely.

Rising child poverty and rising concern

25 October 2018
The number of children living in poverty in the UK is now at 4.1 million and will reach over 5 million by 2021, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies. And children who are in poverty are now living, on average, further below the poverty line than they did 10 years ago.

Child Poverty in London: borough briefings

19 October 2018
Using Trust for London's Poverty Profile and End Child Poverty's 2018 data, we have put together briefings covering low pay, employment, housing, education, council tax support and crisis management, with ward level and borough specific data for all boroughs, as well as comparison tables.

A new poverty measure?

17 September 2018
Today, the Social Metrics Commission (SMC) has published the results of its research into a new way of measuring poverty. You may think that we already have a good way of measuring poverty, and that’s true, so what does this new offering from the SMC add?

Editorial: Poverty 160

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
New poverty figures show that child poverty has risen for the third year in a row, to 4.1 million (after housing costs). And analysis by the University of York shows that families in poverty are now more than £60 a week below the poverty line on average, compared with just over £50 10 years ago.