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Benefit levels

Children of austerity

13 April 2017
Thanks to the UNICEF Office for Research a book has been published today tracing what happened to children in rich countries following the financial crisis.

Health & Sport Committee Debate: Inquiry into the Preventative Health Agenda

12 April 2017

Eight things you should know about the benefit cap

03 April 2017
‘Fairness’ was the word Lord Freud used to justify the lowering of the benefit cap. But there is no fairness to be found in a policy that ignores assessed need, mostly affects people who can’t work to increase their income, and hits households with children in 93 per cent of cases.

Is rising child poverty a price worth paying to protect our children?

16 March 2017
Today’s awful figures tells us several things. Child poverty is high. It’s rising – it’s jumped to 4 million. Two thirds of poor children come from working families. But perhaps the main lesson to take away is that we need to call time on the unfathomable Whitehall orthodoxy, driven by George Osborne but still in place under Theresa May, that rising child poverty is a price worth paying to protect our children.

Broken promises: What has happened to support for low-income working families under universal credit

01 March 2017
Today’s Guardian covered new analysis by CPAG and IPPR on the impact of cuts to universal credit. This analysis shows that universal credit cuts will hit families with children hardest, and will be poverty-producing to the tune of around a million children (comparing universal credit as originally designed with its current form).

A ‘tax’ on work?

11 November 2016
Universal Credit, the new benefit for families on low incomes, was claimed to have huge potential to reduce child poverty, incentivise work and make life easier for struggling families. But this isn’t how it is turning out.

Widening the net and twisting the knife: the benefit cap gets worse

07 November 2016
Today sees the benefit cap – the limit on total benefits which households can receive if no-one works at least 16 hours a week – fall from £26,000 a year to £20,000, or £23,000 in London.

Parents on minimum wage cannot meet basic family costs

22 September 2016
Parents working on the ‘national living wage’ still can’t earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum living standard for their children despite flat (and now falling) inflation and a drop in core household costs like food and energy – even if they both work full-time, warns a new report.

Cost of a child 2016

22 September 2016
Our annual cost of a child research finds that two parents working full-time on the minimum wage are still £50 a week short of what they need to raise their children at a minimum standard of living.

Still too poor to pay: three years of localised council tax support in London

01 September 2016
Read the latest report from CPAG and Z2K in a series that examines how London council tax support schemes have changed in the last three years and analyses the impact these changes have had on claimants.