Benefit cap | Page 3 | CPAG

Benefit cap

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
We entered this general election campaign with child poverty at 4 million, projected to rise to 5.1 million by the end of the next parliament (assuming it’s a five-year term). The next government must get to grips with the underlying causes of poverty to make sure all children have a great start in life – and the opportunity to thrive. We have set out the practical steps politicians can take after 8 June to tackle child poverty.

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
Today, children are already twice as likely to be poor as pensioners. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, child poverty is set to soar to 5.1 million children by 2022 – a 42 per cent rise over ten years.

Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry into the Benefit Cap - CPAG's response

11 April 2017
CPAG has responded to the Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry into the Benefit Cap, drawing in large part on evidence from our Early Warning System on the impact of the cap on families with children. 

Eight things you should know about the benefit cap

03 April 2017
‘Fairness’ was the word Lord Freud used to justify the lowering of the benefit cap. But there is no fairness to be found in a policy that ignores assessed need, mostly affects people who can’t work to increase their income, and hits households with children in 93 per cent of cases.

Social security changes - April 2017

22 March 2017
In April 2017, many social security changes come into force that affect children and young people. We outline their impact.

Early warnings about the lower benefit cap

25 January 2017

Latest Early Warning System newsletter

09 January 2017

A new benefit cap

Issue 255 (December 2016)
Dan Norris describes rules setting the benefit cap at a lower level but with a few more exemptions.

Widening the net and twisting the knife: the benefit cap gets worse

07 November 2016
Today sees the benefit cap – the limit on total benefits which households can receive if no-one works at least 16 hours a week – fall from £26,000 a year to £20,000, or £23,000 in London.

Parents on minimum wage cannot meet basic family costs

22 September 2016
Parents working on the ‘national living wage’ still can’t earn enough to provide an acceptable minimum living standard for their children despite flat (and now falling) inflation and a drop in core household costs like food and energy – even if they both work full-time, warns a new report.