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The growth of emergency food provision to children

Poverty 158 (Autumn 2017)
In 2016/17, Trussell Trust food banks provided 436,938 food parcels to children. The increasing use of food projects by children, together with evidence on the rising levels of food insecurity, has drawn attention to the level of hunger experienced by families with children across the UK.

It’s poverty, not worklessness

Issue 158 (Autumn 2017)
For the last 20 years there has been a mantra among the UK political classes that work is the best solution to poverty. It was the background to the welfare-to-work New Deal programmes in the 2000s.

‘Two-child limit’: the exceptions

Issue 260 (October 2017)
Following the introduction of the ‘two-child limit’ in April 2017 (as described in Bulletin 257), Mark Willis takes a closer look at the exceptions now that government guidance is available.

Does the cap still fit?

Issue 259 (August 2017)
Carla Clarke reviews the latest on legal challenges to the benefit cap.

From ESA to UC

Issue 259 (August 2017)
Simon Osborne looks at the rules regarding claimants ‘migrating’ from employment and support allowance (ESA) to universal credit (UC).

The Social Security (Scotland) Bill

Issue 259 (August 2017)
Kirsty McKechnie and Jenny Duncan describe an important step towards primary legislation regarding benefits in Scotland.

UC earnings and problems

Issue 259 (August 2017)
David Simmons describes some of the issues when a claimant is paid twice during a universal credit (UC) monthly assessment period.

25 years on: reflections on social justice

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Since she took office, Theresa May has adopted the language of ‘social justice’, promising to end the ‘burning injustice’ that some are born into lives of more opportunity than others, because of poverty, race, gender or class. There have been promises of a green paper, setting out her reform agenda. ‘Social justice’ has been high on the agenda before.

‘Loud and clear’ no more: the shift from child poverty to ‘troubled families’

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
The legally binding commitment to eradicate child poverty, once agreed upon by all our main political parties, no longer exists. Instead, the social policy focus at the current time is on ‘troubled’ and ‘workless’ families. Stephen Crossley examines the shifts that have taken place in recent years, highlighting some causes for concern.

Editorial: Poverty 157

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Under David Cameron we saw child poverty targets scrapped and poverty reframed as a matter not of lack of money but of poor ‘life chances’, while the number of children in poverty increased. Theresa May promised to address the ‘burning injustices’ in society, including poverty, but has continued to pursue policies which are projected to drive child poverty up to over 5 million by the end of this parliament.