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Transforming tribunals – what CPAG says

Issue 255 (December 2016)
The Ministry of Justice wants to make radical changes to the tribunals system. This will include making social security appeals ‘entirely online’ and ending multi-member tribunal panels.

A new benefit cap

Issue 255 (December 2016)
Dan Norris describes rules setting the benefit cap at a lower level but with a few more exemptions.

PIP: aids, appliances and caselaw

Issue 254 (October 2016)
Gwyneth King reviews some caselaw on the relevance of aids and appliances in the assessment for entitlement to personal independence payment (PIP).

The HB family premium: new claims, new problems

Issue 254 (October 2016)
Barbara Donegan describes some fine but important details regarding continuing entitlement to the family premium in housing benefit (HB).

New 2016/17 student loans and benefits

Issue 254 (October 2016)
Angela Toal explains two changes to English student funding for advanced level courses from the 2016/17 academic year, and how the new funding affects social security benefits.

Universal credit and ‘natural migration’

Issue 254 (October 2016)
Simon Osborne looks at the circumstances in which a claimant with current entitlement to a ‘legacy’ benefit can end up on universal credit (UC) following a change in circumstances.

GPOW kapowed?

Issue 254 (October 2016)
Martin Williams considers the implications of a recent Upper Tribunal case on the correct approach to determining whether a European Economic Area (EEA) migrant has a right of residence as a jobseeker under what is widely referred to as the ‘GPOW’ test.

Unfinished business: where next for extended schools?

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
Schools which deliver a range of services beyond their core function of classroom education are known as ‘extended schools’, offering anything from childcare outside basic school hours, to sports and arts activities and adult learning sessions.

Still too poor to pay

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
While the myriad of social security cuts introduced by the Welfare Reform Act 2012 have rightfully generated extensive reporting, monitoring and analysis, the abolition of council tax benefit has slipped by relatively unnoticed.

The cost of children

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
Families with children face a particular set of poverty risks. As children come into their lives, parents have a duty to care for them, something which takes time and which thus reduces the hours available to undertake paid work.