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Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. 

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Inequality and instability: why more equal societies have more stable economies

Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
According to the economic orthodoxy of the last thirty years, a stiff dose of inequality is a necessary condition for economic progress. Higher rewards and lower taxes at the top, it is claimed, boost enterprise and deliver a larger economic pie.

Ending child poverty: a right or a responsibility?

Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
This year the European Union will publish its Recommendation on Child Poverty. This is expected to be based on three ‘pillars’ – access to adequate resources, access to services and opportunities, and children’s participation – and to argue for a strong rights-based approach to eradicating child poverty.

Low pay, no pay churning: the hidden story of work and worklessness

Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
Rather than the popular image of feckless people languishing in long-term unemployment, recent research for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has found that the predominant experience of being out of work is one of moving in and out of low-paid, short-term jobs, and on and off benefits.

Doing better for families

Issue 141 (Spring 2012)
Dominic Richardson summarises the OECD’s recent report on families, revealing some of the issues faced and how we might do better.

Tackling child poverty in partnership

Issue 141 (Spring 2012)
The Child Poverty Act 2010 places an obligation on governments to end child poverty in the UK by 2020. It also places new duties on devolved administrations and local government to tackle child poverty.

Benefit uprating: a return to human decency?

Issue 141 (Spring 2012)
In tough economic times, public debate can sometimes become more understanding of the plight of the worst off, but at other times show elements of mean-spirited selfishness. Nowhere has the latter response been more evident than in recent debates about the uprating of benefits.

Universal credit: the gender impact

Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)
The government’s plans to introduce a new universal credit are intended to improve work incentives and simplify a complex benefits system, but may work against its duty to promote gender equality.

Riots, redistribution and reparation

Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)
Many people have asked why a tiny proportion of (mostly) young people rioted this summer. They have also questioned the part that rising inequalities could have played in making many people poor and some angry.

End of a Faustian pact: workfare and riots

Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)
During the past three decades, Guy Standing argues, politicians struck a Faustian pact. In return for ‘labour market flexibility’, government would top up declining wages through subsidies and tax credits and redirect social protection from an emphasis on social solidarity and social insurance to means-tested social assistance.

Child benefits in the European Union

Issue 139 (Summer 2011)
The future of a universal child benefit in the UK is currently under threat. Here Jonathan Bradshaw looks at how the UK compares with other European Union countries in its provision of child benefits and asks what the introduction of a means test will mean for families.