Poverty journal | Page 7 | CPAG

Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. To contact the Editor, Josephine Tucker, please email: jtucker@cpag.org.uk 

 

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CPAG: then, now and in the future

Issue 150 (Winter 2015)
As we approach another general election, Moussa Haddad considers the programme that must be put in place in order to eradicate child poverty by the end of the new government’s term in 2020.

CPAG at 50

Issue 150 (Winter 2015)
As CPAG enters its fiftieth successful year, Pat Thane reminds us of the events that led to its formation in Toynbee Hall in 1965.

Editorial: We must learn from the past

Issue 150 (Winter 2015)
CPAG turns 50 this year.  This leads us, in this issue of Poverty, to take a few moments to look back into our past.

Politically acceptable poverty

Issue 149 (Autumn 2014)
In the current popular discourse the media and the government have positioned migrants from the European Union (EU) as welfare threats and, despite the evidence that they are net contributors to the economy, as acceptable targets for welfare reform.

Interview: Adrian Curtis

Issue 149 (Autumn 2014)
Last year, a shocking 913,000 people were referred to a Trussell Trust food bank for emergency food. In the latest of our series of interviews, Adrian Curtis, the Network Director of the UK’s largest food bank provider, talks to CPAG’s Moussa Haddad.

The ‘un-politics’ of child poverty

Issue 149 (Autumn 2014)
In recent years there has been a great deal of political activity directed towards the goal of ‘eradicating’ child poverty in the UK. The Child Poverty Act enshrines this goal in law, two child poverty strategies have been published and, at times, a great deal of progress has been made.

Editorial: It’s time to step outside the confines of current political debate

Issue 149 (Autumn 2014)
As Poverty goes to press, we have just completed a party conference season that, in its headline policy announcements, has made depressing viewing from a child poverty perspective.

The poor of the mass media

Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
Stories and pictures in the mass media form an important basis for creating opinions of ‘the poor’ and welfare recipients. The media content influences who we think these people are, how we think they behave and what we think should be done to either help or punish them.

Adding to the shame of poverty: the public, politicians and the media

Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
The denigration of people in poverty is not new. It has been evident since at least the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII when the Tudor state assumed de facto responsibility for the care of ‘paupers’, and the terms ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ were coined.

In-work poverty

Issue 148 (Summer 2014)
More than half of all people in poverty now live in a working family. For children in poverty, this figure rises to nearly two-thirds. In each case, this proportion is the highest for all the years for which we have data.