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Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. 

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Editorial: Poverty 155

Issue 155 (Autumn 2016)
A lot has happened since the last issue of Poverty hit your desks. A new prime minister, new ministerial teams, and Brexit on the horizon. We have had only some indications of the direction the new government intends to take.

Meeting London’s childcare challenge

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
New research from 4in10 and the Family and Childcare Trust shows that parents in London are paying over £1 billion on childcare every year. In the run up to the mayoral elections, Megan Jarvie ran a series of focus groups with parents on low incomes to discover the issues they wanted the next mayor to address.

Child support: a forgotten resource for low-income families?

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
It is clear that the government intends to do little to increase the cash incomes of poor families with dependent children. Most poor families are set to get less and less over the next four years.

Sport and poverty

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
Living in a disadvantaged area hampers young people’s development: area-based deprivation is strongly related to higher crime, poorer educational achievement, health problems and high levels of disability.

10 years of austerity: the impact on low-income households and women

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
Tax changes and cuts to public spending and social security have been key to the deficit-reduction strategy implemented by the coalition government between 2010 and 2015 and continued by the Conservative government elected in May 2015.

Editorial: Poverty 154

Issue 154 (Summer 2016)
We are still not all in this together – so where now? Several articles in this issue add to the mounting evidence of the effects of government cuts on particular groups, showing once again that we are not all in this together.

Campaigning on child poverty: the New Zealand experience

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
New Zealand is traditionally regarded as a quiet, safe, egalitarian country with nothing in it more dangerous than a few hobbits. The reality, however, is that between the mid-1980s and the mid-2000s, it experienced the biggest increase in the gap between the rich and the rest of any developed country.

Abolishing hunger among children in the UK

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
We will all have woken up this morning knowing there are children in this country who went to bed last night on an empty stomach. We also know that a large number of those children will have taken that hunger with them to school.

Gordon Brown delivers CPAG’s 50th Anniversary Lecture

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
On 11 November 2015, Gordon Brown delivered CPAG’s 50th Anniversary Lecture. The former Prime Minister and Chancellor spoke powerfully about the history of poverty in the UK and pointed to low pay and the falling value of children’s benefits as important contemporary drivers of child poverty.

Editorial: Poverty 153

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)
In this edition of Poverty we are delighted to feature an edited transcript of the rousing speech delivered by Gordon Brown for CPAG’s 50th Anniversary Lecture in November.