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Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. To contact the Editor, Josephine Tucker, please email: jtucker@cpag.org.uk 

 

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The austerity generation: the impact of cuts to universal credit on family incomes and child poverty

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
CPAG’s new report, The Austerity Generation, sets out the effect of a decade of cuts to social security on family incomes and child poverty, based on modelling by the Institute for Public Policy Research.

Twenty-first century working welfare: the experiences of lone mothers and their children

Poverty 158 (Autumn 2017)
‘A welfare system that recognises work is the best route out of poverty.’ ‘The best route out of poverty is through work.’ Almost 20 years separate these statements from two prime ministers from Labour (Tony Blair in 1997) and Conservative (Theresa May in 2017) governments.

Editorial: Poverty 158

Poverty 158 (Autumn 2017)
As this editorial is being written, Theresa May has just given her closing speech to the Conservative Party conference. Pressure has been building on the government to dial back austerity, improve the affordability of housing, do more to create financial security for young people, and fix its flagship welfare reform programme.

The growth of emergency food provision to children

Poverty 158 (Autumn 2017)
In 2016/17, Trussell Trust food banks provided 436,938 food parcels to children. The increasing use of food projects by children, together with evidence on the rising levels of food insecurity, has drawn attention to the level of hunger experienced by families with children across the UK.

It’s poverty, not worklessness

Issue 158 (Autumn 2017)
For the last 20 years there has been a mantra among the UK political classes that work is the best solution to poverty. It was the background to the welfare-to-work New Deal programmes in the 2000s.

25 years on: reflections on social justice

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Since she took office, Theresa May has adopted the language of ‘social justice’, promising to end the ‘burning injustice’ that some are born into lives of more opportunity than others, because of poverty, race, gender or class. There have been promises of a green paper, setting out her reform agenda. ‘Social justice’ has been high on the agenda before.

‘Loud and clear’ no more: the shift from child poverty to ‘troubled families’

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
The legally binding commitment to eradicate child poverty, once agreed upon by all our main political parties, no longer exists. Instead, the social policy focus at the current time is on ‘troubled’ and ‘workless’ families. Stephen Crossley examines the shifts that have taken place in recent years, highlighting some causes for concern.

Editorial: Poverty 157

Poverty 157 (Summer 2017)
Under David Cameron we saw child poverty targets scrapped and poverty reframed as a matter not of lack of money but of poor ‘life chances’, while the number of children in poverty increased. Theresa May promised to address the ‘burning injustices’ in society, including poverty, but has continued to pursue policies which are projected to drive child poverty up to over 5 million by the end of this parliament.

Developing effective policy to improve job quality

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)
Job quality is back on the UK policy agenda. Indeed, it is back on the policy agenda of many countries’ governments, as well as international governmental bodies.

Not by pay alone

Issue 156 (Winter 2017)
The idea that child poverty in the UK can only be effectively addressed by a combination of better pay and better state support is not a new one. Here, Donald Hirsch revisits it.