Poverty journal | Page 2 | CPAG

Poverty journal

Our journal aims to stimulate debate about the nature, causes and consequences of child poverty in the UK, and potential solutions. To contact the Editor, Josephine Tucker, please email: jtucker@cpag.org.uk 

 

Subscribe to the print edition

 

Editorial: Poverty 161

Poverty 161 (Winter 2018)
What would it take to reverse child poverty increases in the next Budget?

Getting poverty statistics right

Poverty 161 (Winter 2018)
Poverty statistics are important. They help us know where progress is being made – or lost – and hold politicians to account.

Fair Shares and Families study

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
Here, Gill Main describes a new study, looking at how resources are shared in families and how children economise in order to save money, meet their own needs and minimise the stress on their parents.

‘You can’t live on thin air’: the wait for universal support

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
The impact of the transition to universal credit is only just beginning to be felt. By the end of 2018, all job centres across the UK will be processing claimants in the new system, and by 2022 all existing eligible claimants still on the legacy benefits will have been migrated to the new system – 12 million households.

Editorial: Poverty 160

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
New poverty figures show that child poverty has risen for the third year in a row, to 4.1 million (after housing costs). And analysis by the University of York shows that families in poverty are now more than £60 a week below the poverty line on average, compared with just over £50 10 years ago.

The impact of welfare reform on housing security

Poverty 160 (summer 2018)
Welfare reforms underway since 2010 will reduce social security spending by £27 billion a year by 2021, and reach into most aspects of financial support for working-age adults and children.

Editorial: Poverty 159

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The appointment of the new Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Esther McVey, has caused a stir, especially coming shortly after her predecessor had shown some willingness to address universal credit design problems.

The importance of income for children and families: an updated review of the evidence

Poverty 159 (Winter 2018)
It is an all too familiar fact that children from low-income households tend to do less well than children whose parents are better off. They have worse health, do less well at school, and are more likely to have behavioural problems.

Implementing universal credit

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The implementation of universal credit has been beset with problems. Here, Ros White considers the effect on claimants of the delays to the universal credit roll-out and the government’s failure to fully address the complexities involved.

Interview: Paul Gray

Issue 159 (Winter 2018)
The Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) is an independent, non-partisan, statutory body of experts, set up in 1980 to advise the Secretary of State on secondary legislation and to scrutinise how social security policy will be implemented.