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Seeking security in an increasingly insecure world

27 November 2019
As part of our Secure Futures for Children and Families project, Ruth Lister, member of the House of Lords and Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at Loughborough University, examines income security in our social security system in this paper.

A manifesto for ending child poverty

01 November 2019
This election period, we want all candidates from all parties to make a commitment to tackle child poverty. We've put together the big things we're calling for from the next government in a manifesto. We want the next government to invest in children's benefits, bring in a child poverty strategy and build a more effective social security system for us all. 

Pushing Back: Our take on life in poverty in London

18 October 2019
This report has been developed by the A Different Take London panel. We are a group of children, young people and parents with experience of living on a low income, and people from Child Poverty Action Group and the University of Leeds. Between January-June 2019 we have been discussing our own experiences and priorities and talking to the people in our communities, to develop our own agenda around the most important issues affecting the lives of people in poverty and what we think should be done about them.

Worse off: The impact of universal credit on families in Tower Hamlets

16 October 2019
Tower Hamlets has the highest rate of child poverty in the UK: 57 per cent, after housing costs are taken into account. In 2017, Tower Hamlets became one of the first boroughs in London to become a universal credit ‘full service’ area. The London Borough of Tower Hamlets commissioned CPAG to research the experiences of families with children in receipt of universal credit.

Secure Futures for Children and Families: Where we are now and what needs to change

10 October 2019
Secure Futures for Children and Families will ask the question: What does a social security system that provides a secure future for children and families look like? This launch paper sets out where the social security system is now and what needs to change.

Early Warning System report on universal credit and childcare costs

20 August 2019
Financial support to low income families to pay for childcare through working tax credits is being replaced by the childcare element of universal credit. This Early Warning System report examines the impact of this change on parents and childcare providers.

Computer says 'No!' - Stage two: challenging decisions

19 July 2019
In the second in this series, our report looks at problems with understanding decisions, challenging errors and protecting the rights of people claiming universal credit (UC). It outlines some of the problems claimants experience when they try to challenge a decision about their UC award. These problems have been identified by analysing case studies received via CPAG’s Early Warning System (EWS).

Universal credit: what needs to change

05 June 2019
Universal credit: what needs to change to reduce child poverty and make it fit for families? calls for design and funding changes to improve claimants’ experience of universal credit and to reduce child poverty.

Computer says 'no!' - stage one: information provision

01 May 2019
This report presents case studies and analysis from CPAG’s Early Warning System to highlight problems with the information provided to people claiming universal credit.

Early warning system: top issues update April 2019

01 May 2019
CPAG's early warning system takes the temperature of how changes to benefits are affecting families by highlighting the most problematic issues which advisers around the country are seeing. The latest update reveals ongoing problems with people being wrongly directed to universal credit and people moving to universal credit and becoming significantly worse off, as well as a number of problems with specific elements of universal credit: housing costs, real time information, access to appeal rights, and failure to adequately meet support needs.