Policy post listings | CPAG

Policy post listings

Active filters:
  • Report
  • Costs and spending
  • Benefit levels

The cost of a child in 2020

29 October 2020
The year 2020 has put unprecedented pressures on families bringing up children. Parents across the world have taken on new challenges due to the coronavirus pandemic in keeping their children healthy and safe as well as properly fed, educated and entertained at a time when they have been required to stay at home, and when many families’ livelihoods have been threatened. Our cost of a child report looks at what items families need to provide a minimum socially acceptable standard of living for their children in 2020.

Poverty in the pandemic: The impact of coronavirus on low-income families and children

25 August 2020
Coronavirus has turned the lives of families with children upside down. Many parents have lost jobs or been furloughed and many schools and childcare facilities have largely been closed, leaving those still in work facing the impossible task of balancing work with childcare and home schooling. These challenges are particularly acute for low-income families. This new report from CPAG and the Church of England offers an important insight into the day-to-day struggles that families have been dealing with, as well as their strength and resilience in managing such an array of challenges on a limited income.

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

The Cost of a Child in 2018

20 August 2018
Our latest Cost of a Child report shows what it costs to raise a child to age 18, based on what the public thinks is a minimum standard of living. The overall cost of a child (including rent and childcare) is £150,753 for a couple and £183,335 for a lone parent.

Emergency Use Only: 2017 update

20 December 2017
In November 2014, the Emergency Use Only report broke new ground as the first systematic research into food bank use across the United Kingdom. Over two years on, this report takes the recommendations from Emergency Use Only and, for each, assesses the progress made.

The Cost of a Child in 2017

16 August 2017
Our Cost of a Child in 2017 report calculates the cost of raising a child in the UK based on the minimum income standard (MIS).

Still too poor to pay: three years of localised council tax support in London

31 August 2016
Read the latest report from CPAG and Z2K in a series that examines how London council tax support schemes have changed in the last three years and analyses the impact these changes have had on claimants.

Too poor to pay

29 July 2015
Too poor to pay tracks the impact of the second year (2014-15) of localised council tax support schemes which replaced national council tax benefit in April 2013. Council tax support is for people on low incomes, in or out-of-work, and reduces the amount of their council tax bill they are liable for.

Round the clock: in-work poverty and the 'hours question'

29 April 2015
How many hours should a parent work in order not to be poor? In-work poverty is a growing phenomenon in the UK and increasingly central to the political debate. At CPAG, we see in-work poverty as the product of three key variables: low wages; the level of social security that families receive; and the number of hours that parents work. This report explores the third of these factors asking how many hours is it reasonable to expect parents to work.

A new poll tax?

16 July 2014
This report looks at the impact of the localisation of council tax benefit and the accompanying cut to funding in London.