Policy post listings | CPAG

Policy post listings

Active filters:
  • Report
  • Benefit levels
  • UK
  • Childcare

The cost of a child in 2020

29 October 2020
The year 2020 has put unprecedented pressures on families bringing up children. Parents across the world have taken on new challenges due to the coronavirus pandemic in keeping their children healthy and safe as well as properly fed, educated and entertained at a time when they have been required to stay at home, and when many families’ livelihoods have been threatened. Our cost of a child report looks at what items families need to provide a minimum socially acceptable standard of living for their children in 2020.

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

The Cost of a Child in 2017

16 August 2017
Our Cost of a Child in 2017 report calculates the cost of raising a child in the UK based on the minimum income standard (MIS).

Round the clock: in-work poverty and the 'hours question'

29 April 2015
How many hours should a parent work in order not to be poor? In-work poverty is a growing phenomenon in the UK and increasingly central to the political debate. At CPAG, we see in-work poverty as the product of three key variables: low wages; the level of social security that families receive; and the number of hours that parents work. This report explores the third of these factors asking how many hours is it reasonable to expect parents to work.

The Double Lockout: How low income families will be locked out of fair living standards

16 January 2013
This report, published on the eve of the second reading of the Welfare Benefits Up-Rating Bill 2012-13, reveals that the government’s welfare benefit uprating legislation is based on bogus claims and is a poverty-producing bill that will further exclude the poorest workers, jobseekers, carers and disabled people from the mainstream of society.