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Brighter futures: the future path of child poverty in Northern Ireland

11 November 2021
Without action, child poverty in Northern Ireland will rise over the next few years. A slow labour market recovery, a weakened social security system, and a growing income gap between families are contributing to a rising tide of child poverty. New analysis in this briefing paper shows that by 2024/25 child poverty is projected to rise to over 25 per cent. But the analysis also shows that this isn’t inevitable.

Children can't wait: investing in social security to reduce child poverty in Northern Ireland

26 August 2021
The upcoming Anti-Poverty Strategy is a chance for the Northern Irish Executive to invest in measures that make a difference for children. By setting out an ambitious vision, measurable targets, and by committing to investment in children, the Anti-Poverty Strategy can set us on a path to a future where no child grows up in poverty. This briefing by Save the Children UK and CPAG looks at some of the ways the Executive could achieve this. It examines how changes in social security would lift children out of poverty.

Understanding the latest data on the two-child limit

15 July 2021
The data out today shows that, in April 2021, 1.1 million children were affected by the two-child limit – 237,000 more than the previous year.

Mind the gaps - briefing 14

30 October 2020
This is the fourteenth and final in a series of briefings, Mind the Gaps, which highlight some of the gaps in support that exist for children and families affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence of these gaps is drawn from our Early Warning System (EWS) which collects case studies from frontline practitioners working directly with families on the problems they are seeing with the social security system.

Mind the gaps - briefing 12

20 August 2020
This is the twelfth in a series of regular briefings, Mind the Gaps, which highlight some of the gaps in support that exist for children and families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Evidence of these gaps is drawn from our Early Warning System (EWS) which collects case studies from frontline practitioners working directly with families on the problems they are seeing with the social security system.

Mind the gaps - briefing 11

06 August 2020
Today, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has published the most recent set of statistics on the number of households affected by the benefit cap. The number of households affected by the benefit cap (up to May 2020) has almost doubled when compared to the previous quarter – 154,000 households are now affected by the benefit cap compared to 79,000 in February 2020.

Mind the gaps - briefing 6

28 May 2020
This is the sixth in a series of briefings, Mind the Gaps, which highlight some of the gaps in support that exist for children and families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Evidence of these gaps is drawn from our Early Warning System (EWS) which collects case studies from frontline practitioners working directly with families on the problems they are seeing with the social security system.

A child-centred reform of children's social security

18 December 2019
As part of our Secure Futures for Children and Families project, Megan A. Curran, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist at the Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Columbia University, examines how the social security system could be reformed to put children at the centre in this paper.

Election 2017 manifesto

04 May 2017
Today, children are already twice as likely to be poor as pensioners. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, child poverty is set to soar to 5.1 million children by 2022 – a 42 per cent rise over ten years.

Two-child limit - 200,000 more children in poverty

03 April 2017
New cuts limiting universal credit to the first two children in a family – starting Thursday April 6th - will push another 200,000 children below the official poverty line, new analysis by CPAG and the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) shows.