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Response to Social Renewal Advisory Board's call for ideas

25 November 2020
Our submission highlights that children who already faced a higher risk of poverty have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and will be particularly vulnerable during economic recession. Rising child poverty places high costs on society as a whole. It should therefore be of the utmost priority that families with children are able to easily access adequate financial support. 

The cost of a child in 2020

29 October 2020
The year 2020 has put unprecedented pressures on families bringing up children. Parents across the world have taken on new challenges due to the coronavirus pandemic in keeping their children healthy and safe as well as properly fed, educated and entertained at a time when they have been required to stay at home, and when many families’ livelihoods have been threatened. Our cost of a child report looks at what items families need to provide a minimum socially acceptable standard of living for their children in 2020.

CPAG's submission to the Comprehensive Spending Review

06 October 2020
Our submission to the government's forthcoming spending review focusses on strengthening the UK’s economic recovery from COVID-19 by prioritising jobs and skills; levelling up struggling families – helping children maximise their potential; and ensuring every young person receives a superb education.

Poverty in the pandemic: The impact of coronavirus on low-income families and children

25 August 2020
Coronavirus has turned the lives of families with children upside down. Many parents have lost jobs or been furloughed and many schools and childcare facilities have largely been closed, leaving those still in work facing the impossible task of balancing work with childcare and home schooling. These challenges are particularly acute for low-income families. This new report from CPAG and the Church of England offers an important insight into the day-to-day struggles that families have been dealing with, as well as their strength and resilience in managing such an array of challenges on a limited income.

The Safety Net is Gone

05 August 2020
To understand the impact of child poverty on the lives of children and families in England better, CPAG, the Child Welfare Inequalities Project (CWIP) and the Association of Directors of Children’s Services (ADCS) conducted a survey of social workers between January and March 2020 to ask them about the experiences of the families they work with.

Impact of COVID 19 of families

21 July 2020
This report concentrates on the impact of COVID 19 on families living in Scotland and highlights that many families are struggling financially due to inadequate support from the social security system and/or being unable to work while schools and childcare providers are closed.

The impact of COVID 19 on migrants

21 July 2020
This report concentrates on the impact of COVID 19 on migrants living in Scotland and highlights social security policy and administration has left some migrants with little or no income during the pandemic.

Prevent poverty to secure the future for children and families

17 June 2020
In the latest Secure Futures paper, Adrian Sinfield examines the importance of preventing poverty, alongside alleviating it.

Mind the gaps - briefing 5

14 May 2020
This is the fifth in a series of weekly briefings, Mind the Gaps, which highlight some of the gaps in support that exist for children and families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Evidence of these gaps is drawn from our Early Warning System (EWS) which collects case studies from frontline practitioners working directly with families on the problems they are seeing with the social security system.

Briefing for Lords debate on social security uprating

05 March 2020
It is of course welcome that after a four-year freeze, most working-age benefits are now to be uprated in line with inflation through this uprating order. However, this step does nothing to reverse any of the cuts to benefits in recent years: it will only keep benefits at the same real-terms value they have this year, and ‘lock in’ the current shortfall. It does nothing to compensate for the losses caused to families by years of failure to uprate benefits adequately while prices for food, bills and clothing have continued to rise. If we are to restore families’ living standards and start addressing rising poverty, benefits will need to rise by more than inflation to compensate for what has been lost.