Children's benefits and cost of living | CPAG

Children's benefits and cost of living

We know from our Cost of a Child research that even when two parents work full time on the minimum wage, a family will be £50 a week short of the income they need to meet the basic costs of raising a child. The cost of living is rising, wages are not. Two-thirds of poor children live in working families.

Compounding this squeeze on family incomes are benefit freezes and cuts. These freezes and cuts mean the link has been broken between what families need to give their children a decent quality of life, and the support they get.

Briefings

Election 2017 manifesto

Today, children are already twice as likely to be poor as pensioners. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, child poverty is set to soar to 5.1 million children by 2022 – a 42 per cent rise over ten years.

Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry into the Benefit Cap - CPAG's response

CPAG has responded to the Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry into the Benefit Cap, drawing in large part on evidence from our Early Warning System on the impact of the cap on families with children. 

Reports

The Cost of a Child in 2019

Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

Early Warning System report on universal credit and childcare costs

Financial support to low income families to pay for childcare through working tax credits is being replaced by the childcare element of universal credit. This Early Warning System report examines the impact of this change on parents and childcare providers.

The Cost of a Child in 2018

Our latest Cost of a Child report shows what it costs to raise a child to age 18, based on what the public thinks is a minimum standard of living. The overall cost of a child (including rent and childcare) is £150,753 for a couple and £183,335 for a lone parent.

News

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
The latest report in our annual Cost of a Child series finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply.

Cost of a Child in 2018 released

20 August 2018
CPAG's latest Cost of a Child report shows what it costs to raise a child to age 18, based on what the public thinks is a minimum standard of living. The overall cost of a child (including rent and childcare) is £150,753 for a couple and £183,335 for a lone parent.

Poverty is ‘making children sick’, say children’s doctors

11 May 2017
Poverty and low income is seriously affecting the health of UK children paediatricians are warning. Our survey with the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) found almost half of paediatricians who reponded say the problem is getting worse. 

Blogs

Costs and spending on decent childhoods

04 September 2019
The new school year is underway after the long summer break. This can be an expensive time for families. Most parents will have faced significant costs in recent weeks, from holiday childcare to new school uniforms. But to what extent are different families able to meet those costs? Every year for the past eight years, we have published research on what it costs to raise children from birth to age 18. This year the research coincides with the Spending Review, and puts a spotlight on how the government does support, and how it should support, families with the extra costs of children.

The ‘poverty premium’: a pernicious double whammy

19 September 2018
The proposed new poverty measure released this week by the Social Metrics Commission showed that whether or not you’re in poverty is determined by your income and your costs: not having enough resources to meet your essential costs is a defining feature of poverty.

We can all agree: children deserve our support

20 August 2018
Politicians are always concerned about public opinion, and they often seek to shape it. But, despite their efforts, we know that public policy and public opinion do not always match, and two pieces of recent research illustrate this clearly.