Children's benefits and cost of living | CPAG

Children's benefits and cost of living

We know from our Cost of a Child research that even when two parents work full time on the minimum wage, a family will be £47 a week short of the income they need to meet the basic costs of raising a child. 70 per cent of poor children live in working families.

Poverty restricts children’s opportunities, and can mean that they are left behind. We need investment in children to ensure they are released from the grip of poverty. This means taking action now to:

  • restore the child element in universal credit, including the higher element for first children, and increase child benefit by at least £5 a week because it has lost 23% of its value since 2010;
  • lift the two-child limit, which will otherwise push 300,000 children into poverty and one million more into deeper poverty by 2023/24;
  • remove the benefit cap, which largely affects lone parents with young children who are least able to escape the cap through work.

Briefings

Seeking security in an increasingly insecure world

As part of our Secure Futures for Children and Families project, Ruth Lister, member of the House of Lords and Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at Loughborough University, examines income security in our social security system in this paper.

A manifesto for ending child poverty

This election period, we want all candidates from all parties to make a commitment to tackle child poverty. We've put together the big things we're calling for from the next government in a manifesto. We want the next government to invest in children's benefits, bring in a child poverty strategy and build a more effective social security system for us all. 

Impact of the lower benefit cap: CPAG submission to the Work and Pensions Select Committee

The Work and Pensions Select Committee re-opened its inquiry into the lower benefit cap this year. CPAG submitted evidence on the impacts of the lower cap, drawing on analysis of government statistics and cases from our Early Warning System. Following this written submission we were invited to give oral evidence to the committee to highlight our serious concerns about this policy and the hardship it is causing families.

Reports

The Cost of a Child in 2019

Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

Early Warning System report on universal credit and childcare costs

Financial support to low income families to pay for childcare through working tax credits is being replaced by the childcare element of universal credit. This Early Warning System report examines the impact of this change on parents and childcare providers.

All Kids Count: The impact of the two-child limit after two years

CPAG, the Church of England, Women's Aid, Turn2Us and the Refugee Council have published a new report looking at the impact of the two-child limit. An estimated 160,000 families have already been affected by the two-child limit to date; the majority are working families and the majority have just three children. More than 800,000 families and three million children could eventually be affected by it, while a third of all children will be affected in many constituencies across the country.

News

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
The latest report in our annual Cost of a Child series finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply.

Lone parents aim for Supreme Court in ongoing legal challenge against the ‘two-child limit’ in tax credits and universal credit

16 April 2019
Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) is seeking leave to appeal to the Supreme Court on behalf of two lone mothers with children affected by the two-child limit.

Widowed Parent’s Allowance: court rules in favour of bereaved mother who was not married to her children’s father

30 August 2018
Landmark Supreme Court judgement that denying bereavement benefits to unmarried, cohabiting partners with children is incompatible with human rights law.

Blogs

Income security for families with children

01 November 2019
Low-income families are faced with ongoing challenges in budgeting and balancing the regular costs of living with meeting the need for more occasional and one-off items. But it is not just expenditure that is ‘lumpy’ in this way. Income can also come into households at different times and in different amounts. Research with families looking in depth at money management highlights something of a paradox in the juggling of low income.

Costs and spending on decent childhoods

04 September 2019
The new school year is underway after the long summer break. This can be an expensive time for families. Most parents will have faced significant costs in recent weeks, from holiday childcare to new school uniforms. But to what extent are different families able to meet those costs? Every year for the past eight years, we have published research on what it costs to raise children from birth to age 18. This year the research coincides with the Spending Review, and puts a spotlight on how the government does support, and how it should support, families with the extra costs of children.

New £10 Scottish Child Payment a game-changer – and a pointer to what’s needed across the UK

04 July 2019
The new £10 a week Scottish Child Payment for each child in low income families, announced by the Scottish Government last week, is a game-changer in the fight to end child poverty in Scotland - and a pointer to what is possible, and so badly needed, at UK level. It’s also an inspiring reminder of what can be achieved when child poverty campaigners bring together partners across civic society at the same time where there is a political will, and a government with a statutory obligation, to end child poverty.