Childcare | CPAG

Childcare

Helping families into work is a crucial part of ending child poverty, but childcare - which enables many to work - is the single most expensive item in the budgets of many families with small children. Our Cost of a Child research found that the cost of childcare jumped by 42 per cent between 2008 and 2014, over twice the official inflation rate.

We need a national childcare strategy that offers 30-hours of free, high-quality childcare universally. In addition, extended schools should provide comprehensive out-of-school and holiday childcare from 8am-6pm.

Briefings and reports

Social security – where have we been and where are we going?

As our Secure Futures for Children and Families gets underway, our CEO Alison Garnham looks back and the history of the social security system, what has gone wrong and what the future could look like. 

The Cost of a Child in 2019

Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

Early Warning System report on universal credit and childcare costs

Financial support to low income families to pay for childcare through working tax credits is being replaced by the childcare element of universal credit. This Early Warning System report examines the impact of this change on parents and childcare providers.

News

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
The latest report in our annual Cost of a Child series finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply.

Raising a child in London

08 September 2015
London childcare costs leave many parents on the minimum wage little or no better off for working more, a new report warns.

Hard Work: parental employment in London

01 September 2015
Our new report looks at parental employment rates in London, and what can be done to make working a better option for parents in the capital.

Blogs

Costs and spending on decent childhoods

04 September 2019
The new school year is underway after the long summer break. This can be an expensive time for families. Most parents will have faced significant costs in recent weeks, from holiday childcare to new school uniforms. But to what extent are different families able to meet those costs? Every year for the past eight years, we have published research on what it costs to raise children from birth to age 18. This year the research coincides with the Spending Review, and puts a spotlight on how the government does support, and how it should support, families with the extra costs of children.

Universal credit and childcare costs - what you need to know

20 August 2019
As the school year starts again, parents will be sending their wee ones off to school or nursery and will perhaps be thinking about moving into work themselves. For lots of people this will also involve turning to universal credit for help to pay with childcare costs. A new report from CPAG in Scotland’s Early Warning System suggests for some parents and childcare providers claiming universal credit childcare costs may be not be entirely straightforward.

Universal credit: a new era?

11 January 2019
Universal credit needs fixing. That’s certainly not the first time we’ve said that, but today the new Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Amber Rudd MP seemed to agree. At a Jobcentre in south London we got our first glimpse of what changes she has planned to make the benefit work better for everyone. Meanwhile, a couple of miles away the High Court announced that we had won our universal credit assessment period case. What do these two things mean for people claiming universal credit?