Education and childcare | CPAG

Education and childcare

Helping families into work is a crucial part of ending child poverty, but childcare - which enables many to work - is the single most expensive item in the budgets of many families with small children. Our Cost of a Child research found that the cost of childcare jumped by 42 per cent between 2008 and 2014, over twice the official inflation rate.

We need a national childcare strategy that offers 30-hours of free, high-quality childcare universally. In addition, extended schools should provide comprehensive out-of-school and holiday childcare from 8am-6pm.

Find out about our Cost of the School Day project.

Briefings and reports

A child-centred reform of children's social security

As part of our Secure Futures for Children and Families project, Megan A. Curran, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist at the Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Columbia University, examines how the social security system could be reformed to put children at the centre in this paper.

Social security – where have we been and where are we going?

As our Secure Futures for Children and Families gets underway, our CEO Alison Garnham looks back and the history of the social security system, what has gone wrong and what the future could look like. 

The Cost of a Child in 2019

Our annual Cost of a Child report this year finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply: lone parents working full time for the so-called national living wage ('NLW') are 21% (£80 a week) short of what they need – after paying for rent, childcare and council tax - a gap that has more than doubled from 10% since 2012.

News

The Cost of a Child in 2019

04 September 2019
The latest report in our annual Cost of a Child series finds that the overall cost of a child up to age 18 (including rent and childcare) is £185,000 for lone parents (up 19% since 2012) and £151,000 for couples (up 5.5% since 2012). The gap between lone parents’ actual income and what they need to meet family needs has grown sharply.

Raising a child in London

08 September 2015
London childcare costs leave many parents on the minimum wage little or no better off for working more, a new report warns.

Hard Work: parental employment in London

01 September 2015
Our new report looks at parental employment rates in London, and what can be done to make working a better option for parents in the capital.

Blogs

Is food the right response to child hunger?

13 January 2020
A Mori poll for the Trussell Trust, published on 16 October in the Daily Mirror, showed more than half the British public think food banks are an embarrassment to this country and 7 in 10 think they should not exist in a modern society. They think it’s the government’s responsibility to deal with it. They are right. More people than ever, 21%, say ‘poverty and inequality’ is the most important issue facing Britain - the highest rate since 1997.

Domestic abuse is an economic issue – for its victims and for society

06 December 2019
Violence against women is first and foremost a violation of women’s human rights. During these 16 days of activism against VAWG (violence against women and girls), we highlight how economic inequality is facilitating violence perpetrated by men against women. We need to make our economy work for women so women can be safer, and a properly functioning social security system is integral to this.

Upfront for families? Childcare costs in universal credit

29 October 2019
For many families upfront childcare costs are a significant barrier to work. Under tax credits, parents can get financial support for upfront childcare costs. However, under universal credit any help with childcare is paid retrospectively. This is a big problem as the majority of childcare requires parents to pay for a month/term in advance.