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UC families face £660 income cut as Bank of England increases inflation expectations

21 March 2022
In a letter to the chancellor last week, the Bank of England stated that it expected inflation to be “around 8 per cent” this spring. With UC set to rise by just 3.1% in April, families with children on universal credit now face a real-terms cut of around £660 per year, on average.

Second benefits cut is unthinkable - organisations call for minimum 7% benefits rise

17 March 2022
Benefits must keep pace with the rising cost of living. Child Poverty Action Group joins forces with over 50 organisations to call for benefits to be increased by at least 7 per cent in April to match inflation.

UC families face £570 income cut as costs surge

15 February 2022
DWP figures out today show 3.6 million children were in families on universal credit (UC) in November. Because UC is set to rise by only 3.1% this April when inflation is expected to peak at 7.25%, most of these families face a real-terms cut of around £570 per year in social security support, just as supermarket prices and energy costs surge, new analysis from Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) shows.

CPAG's response to the spending review

27 October 2021
Responding to today’s Spending Review, Sara Ogilvie, policy director at Child Poverty Action Group said the lower universal credit taper rate is “good news”, but added: "The long-overdue decision to lower the UC taper rate will help lots of low earners. But there was nothing for those who cannot work – carers, those with young children and people who are sick or disabled - who face the same cost pressures as other households and will still have a black hole in their finances after the universal credit cut...

Response to announcement of a Household Support Grant

30 September 2021
Responding to today’s Government announcement of a Household Support Grant, chief executive of Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham said: “Ministers are right to worry about low-income families, but now isn’t the time for stop-gap measures. Grants offer no stability to millions of struggling households, and will leave far too many out of pocket when the £20 universal credit cut hits. Investment in local support is necessary and welcome – but unless government drops the £20 cut, families will still face a living standards crisis this winter and beyond.”

Supreme Court decision on two-child limit

09 July 2021
A hugely disappointing judgment which fails to give any meaningful recognition to the reality of the policy on the ground and its desperately unfair impact on children.

New universal credit assessment period regulations

16 November 2020
New universal credit regulations come in to force today. This follows our successful legal case concerning people paid monthly getting two wages in one UC assessment period.

Legal update

10 February 2020
Our legal team has had a busy start to the new year. Last week we learned we had been successful in our High Court case challenging the fact that the higher rate of bereavement support payment for families with children is currently only paid if a spouse or civil partner dies, and not when the couple were not married or in a civil partnership. This follows a similar challenge to the previous widowed parent’s allowance – the Supreme Court found in favour of a mother and her four children in that case, but, although the law is not compatible with human rights law, the government has still not resolved the issue.

Universal credit claimants left in the dark about their entitlements

01 May 2019
Universal credit (UC) claimants are routinely in the dark about how much they should receive, how their awards are calculated and if and how they can challenge DWP decisions, because the Department’s communications with claimants are opaque and inadequate.

High Court finds DWP unlawful on universal credit assessments

11 January 2019
In a test case victory for a group of working lone mothers, the High Court found today that the way the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has been assessing income from employment through its Universal Credit (UC) work assessment periods is unlawful.