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What does blue-collar Conservatism look like?

12 October 2015
After the 2015 election the Prime Minister promised ‘blue-collar Conservatism’, which he said was about 'giving everyone in our country the chance to get on, with the dignity of a job, the pride of a pay cheque, a home of their own and the security and peace of mind that comes from being able to support a family’.

No such thing as a free lunch?

22 September 2015
A mere two years ago, the government introduced universal free school meals for infants. We were delighted at the time - and said so. Evidence from pilot projects showed that while all children benefit from free school meals, low-income children benefit the most.

London costs: raising children in the capital

08 September 2015
"It will come as little surprise that raising a child is expensive, and that in London it has the potential to be more expensive than other parts of the country. However, new research from Child Poverty Action Group on the extra costs of children in the capital has brought up some intriguing findings that are relevant for the whole country."

How can London mothers escape the poverty trap?

01 September 2015
Why are mothers in London less likely to work than their counterparts across the country, and how can we ensure that having more parents in jobs brings the capital’s high child poverty rates down?

The minimum standard of living is getting harder to reach

12 August 2015
The basic cost of bringing up a child is getting harder to meet. New CPAG research updating our annual 'Cost of a child' report has found that while the cost of raising a child from birth to 18 remains high, at £149,805, state support for meeting those costs is diminishing sharply.

Additional family hardship on the horizon

12 August 2015
Since the election an important debate has opened up over how far state benefits should be underpinning family living standards. The government is clearly trying to reduce what it sees as unnecessary dependency, including for families in low-paid work. It has approached this from multiple angles.

Sanctions: where's the support?

22 July 2015
It’s all change at Westminster – once again. After five years dominated by the pace and scale of change to the social security system, the new Parliament promises some more pretty big changes, many of which were discussed in this week’s Welfare Reform & Work Bill debate.

First thoughts on the ‘National Living Wage’

08 July 2015
A substantial increase in the National Minimum Wage for over-25s (or National Living Wage, as Osborne’s re-badging has it) can only be a good thing for low-paid workers. It should be celebrated. That much, at least, is clear.

Don’t let tax credit changes freeze mums out of work

07 July 2015
What's the point of working tax credits? David Cameron has called their use into question by highlighting the role they play in enabling big businesses to get away with paying poverty wages. But this overlooks the important role that working tax credits play in enabling parents to enter or stay in the labour market working less than full-time.

London: our child poverty capital

26 June 2015
The child poverty figures released yesterday once again showed London still tops the league table of high child poverty rates but, more strikingly, highlighted the growing impact housing costs are having on poverty in the capital.