Posts | Page 6 | CPAG

Posts

Active filters:
  • Blog
  • Child poverty statistics

What we didn’t talk about in the election

22 June 2015
We really are living in the age of the permanent campaign. The general election was just weeks ago, but the main parties and political commentators have moved on and are looking at events through the lens of the 2020 election. Before that happens, it’s worth noting something pretty peculiar about the 2015 campaign.

Child poverty figures – fix the problem, not the warning light

03 June 2015
On 25th June the Department for Work and Pensions will release updated figures on poverty, including child poverty, for 2013-14. These figures were delayed until after the election, meaning the last government went into a General Election with child poverty figures available only up to the end of March 2013 –  that’s before most of the austerity-driven benefit cuts had been implemented.

How has the coalition done on child poverty?

06 May 2015
When George Osborne claimed in last month’s Budget to have reduced child poverty, I’m sure mine weren’t the only raised eyebrows. Michael Gove made a similar claim yesterday, that the government has ‘been able to save £21bn in the welfare budget and at the same time reduce inequality and reduce child poverty in this country’. 

The first 100 days - what should a progressive government implement?

29 April 2015
We contributed an essay to a new publication by the Centre for Labour and Social Studies: The first 100 days - what should a progressive government implement? The essay highlights the child poverty crisis the new government will face, with the number of children growing up in hardship on the increase for the first time in a decade.

What was missing from the 2015 Budget? Anything to do with child poverty

19 March 2015
'This was a "see no poverty, hear no poverty" budget from a government in denial. The Chancellor made claim to a truly national recovery throughout his speech but this is a ‘See no poverty, Hear no poverty’ Budget which continues to leave children and the low paid behind.

The limits of Universal Credit

06 March 2015
Since 2010 the Government has overseen an ambitious, large-scale programme of income redistribution. From poorer to richer groups. That’s the striking conclusion to be drawn from the most comprehensive analysis to date of the Government’s social policy record published recently by the LSE and the universities of Manchester and York.

A quick guide to...the new child poverty figures expected on Tuesday

27 June 2014
Next week sees the publication of probably the last set of official child poverty figures - for 2012-13 - before the 2015 general election. Here’s a quick guide to what we should expect and what it all means.

Can universal credit be made to work to reduce poverty?

18 June 2014
Universal credit (UC) may be much-maligned but like it or not, it’s coming our way. Given this, how can it best deliver on its dual promise to make work pay and reduce poverty? The TUC and Child Poverty Action Group have been exploring this question in recent months, ably assisted by Howard Reed of Landman Economics. Here, we offer a sneak preview of our results.

The government’s child poverty strategy needs to be more child-focused, more poverty-focused, and more strategic

23 May 2014
This week, the official consultation closed on, potentially, the Coalition’s most important social policy objective– the new child poverty strategy. Running from 2014-17, the draft strategy covers the critical period during which we’d expect to see a big push to meet the statutory target to end child poverty by 2020 – especially given Iain Duncan Smith’s recent reaffirmation that he both remains committed to the target, and expects it to be met.

What is happening to child poverty?

28 February 2014
Measures, measures everywhere and not a drop of sense. This morning George Osborne and Iain Duncan Smith put their new child poverty strategy out to consultation with the claim that they have reduced child poverty by 300,000 to date, while at the same time denigrating the yardstick they appear to be performing so well against. So what exactly is going on with respect to child poverty in the UK?