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The big warning in Unicef’s report on child wellbeing

18 April 2016
Unicef’s analysis of child wellbeing across the developed world, released today, is emphatic that increasing family incomes is a critical tool to boost children’s educational success, health and happiness. In saying this, it is issuing a pretty clear warning to the United Kingdom government that poverty-producing policies will deprive children of happy, healthy and secure childhoods.

How many children will Universal Credit lift out of poverty?

22 March 2016
Just days after Iain Duncan Smith resigned as Work & Pensions Secretary, citing his unease with the Summer Budget’s cuts to Universal Credit, today the Government has published a written answer in which it refuses to update its own assessment of how many children, if any, will be lifted out of poverty by the flagship policy following these cuts.

A win is a win – our campaign on child poverty measures

09 March 2016
When the Welfare Reform and Work Bill was published back at the end of last summer, it drew a cacophony of groans from people working with children and families.  They knew that when,  in 2013,  the coalition government first consulted on scrapping income-based measures of child poverty and moving towards a life chances approach, 98% of the consultation responses disagreed vehemently with the idea.

The UK set for the biggest increase in child poverty in a generation

02 March 2016
The IFS today reports on its projections for poverty levels both now and looking forward to 2020. Its findings are in keeping with those from the Resolution Foundation in the autumn. The IFS projects a 50 per cent increase in relative child poverty – from 17.0 per cent in 2014-15 to 25.7 per cent in 2020-21 – and an increase in absolute child poverty from 16.7 per cent in 2014-15 to 18.3 per cent in 2020-21.

Update: Government votes down Lords amendment to keep child poverty reporting

24 February 2016
Yesterday the Government voted to scrap an amendment made to the Welfare Reform and Work Bill by the House of Lords, to oblige the Government to report on how many children are growing up poor. The House of Lords voted resoundingly for an amendment which reinserted measures of poverty based on income (rather than the 'life chances' measures, including educational attainment and parental worklessness the Government prefers). 

Redefining Child Poverty Doesn't Tackle the Issue - The Government Must Show That All Kids Count

26 January 2016
After some time on the back-foot, if not in headlong retreat, common sense won out last night in the latest stage of the Welfare Reform and Work Bill's passage through parliament.

Frozen out: government’s silent treatment on Welfare Reform and Work Bill

21 December 2015
Last week the Welfare Reform and Work Bill entered committee stage in the House of Lords. The bill will scrap all the government’s child poverty targets and measures, and make sweeping cuts to social security. Given the wide-ranging changes it seeks to make, it is surprising – and worrying – that ministers have provided so little detail on how the new measures will work and what the impacts will be on families with children.

The great child poverty conjuring trick

11 December 2015
Now you see it, now you don't. Steve Bell sums up the government's plans to scrap child poverty targets. Instead of measuring and acting on child poverty, they just want to measure how many children have parents who are out of work and how well they do at their GCSEs.

Our letter to the Guardian: Ending child poverty starts with counting it

08 December 2015
This letter was published in the Guardian on 7 December 2015. Ten years ago, on his first day as party leader, David Cameron vowed that “the test for our policies will not be how they affect the better off, but how they help the worst-off in our country”.

Now you see it, now you don't. The government's magic trick on child poverty.

07 December 2015
Now you see it…  Now you don’t.  The government’s rustled up a party trick for the kids this Christmas. They’re going to make 3.7 million of them disappear. Britain’s children aren’t going anywhere, of course, particularly those who are growing up poor.