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CPAG wins Supreme Court bedroom tax breakthrough

09 November 2016
The country’s highest court, the Supreme Court, has ruled that the Government discriminated against a disabled woman and her husband and a severely disabled child who needs overnight care through the implementation of the ‘bedroom tax’.

Widening the net and twisting the knife: the benefit cap gets worse

07 November 2016
Today sees the benefit cap – the limit on total benefits which households can receive if no-one works at least 16 hours a week – fall from £26,000 a year to £20,000, or £23,000 in London.

Promoting fairness? Lowering the benefit cap will push more families into poverty

25 July 2016
This autumn the benefit cap will be cut, squeezing low-income families even further and pushing more people into poverty. The Welfare Reform & Work Act 2016 lowers the cap to £23,000 per annum for families (or £15,410 for single claimants) in London and £20,000 for families (or £13,400 for single claimants) outside of London.

Supreme Court to decide on ‘unlawful’ bedroom tax

23 February 2016
Following last month’s victory in the Court of Appeal, the battle continues for Paul and Sue Rutherford and their severely disabled grandson, Warren. The Court held that the ‘bedroom tax’ (or under-occupancy penalty) is in breach of the Human Rights Act 1998.

CPAG is urgently looking for bedroom tax cases

02 February 2016
CPAG is urgently looking for case studies following the Court of Appeal’s decision in R(Rutherford) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2016] EWCA Civ 29, which is likely to be appealed to the Supreme Court.

Bedroom tax: time for a dishonourable retirement

28 January 2016
The bedroom tax (or under-occupancy penalty, as the government prefers), after smashing through so many families’ carefully balanced budgets, has finally hit a legal wall.

Court of appeal rules that ‘bedroom tax’ is unlawful

27 January 2016
Today, the Court of Appeal has ruled that the so-called ‘bedroom tax’ is unlawful because of its impact on vulnerable individuals. The Court of Appeal dealt with two appeals together and in both cases ruled that the discrimination against victims of domestic violence and disabled children was not lawful.

What is happening to discretionary housing payments?

16 March 2015
If you had heard the Minister for Disabled People, Mark Harper, reassuring MP on Monday this week about future funding levels of Discretionary Housing Payments, you would be forgiven for believing that, on this issue, the Government was making adequate resources available to meet needs

CPAG criticises housing payments cut

30 January 2015
Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) has strongly criticised the government’s decision, announced today, to cut local authorities’ budgets for discretionary housing payments by 24% (from £165m in 2014 -15 to £125m for 2015-16)[fn]Discretionary Financial Assistance Regulations 2001 SI No. 11167 p1599[/fn]

The Future of Judicial Review

26 June 2014
It’s hardly surprising that politicians tend not to like having the lawfulness of their decisions questioned by the Courts. Like any frustrated litigant, when a Minister loses a judicial review case he or she is more likely to blame the judge than their own decision-making, whereas when they win, they’re quick to criticise the Claimant for bringing the case in the first place.