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Benefits freeze must end as inflation jumps

13 June 2017
An urgent re-think of the current four-year freeze in benefits is needed to protect struggling families from further damage as inflation jumps to 2.9% - a four-year high - Child Poverty Action Group warns.

Two-child limit for universal credit: 200,000 more children put in poverty

03 April 2017
New cuts limiting universal credit to the first two children in a family – starting Thursday April 6th - will push another 200,000 children below the official poverty line, new analysis from the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) and the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) shows.

Budget 2017: new language but more thin gruel for struggling families

08 March 2017
Responding to today’s Budget, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “The Budget may have put the next generation first in words, but it was silent on the huge rises in child poverty projected by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (1) over the next five years. Nothing does more to damage the childhoods and life chances of our children than poverty...

CPAG responds to Prime Minister’s ‘shared society’ speech

09 January 2017
Commenting on the Prime Minister's speech today, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said: "There are nearly 4 million UK children in poverty so the Prime Minister is absolutely right to say Government should commit to a programme of social reform which adds up to more than policies for dysfunctional families or for our very brightest children...

Response to statement on universal credit

20 July 2016
Responding today to Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green’s announcement of further delays to the roll out of Universal Credit, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “Although we don’t want the government to rush through the roll out of universal credit if it’s not ready as it will eventually involve half the nation’s children, this latest delay does beg the question of whether the benefit is still fit for purpose...

UK child poverty rises - 66% poor children now in working families

28 June 2016
In 2014-15, UK child poverty increased by 200,000 to 3.9 million (after housing costs). 66% of poor children live in working families (up from 64%). London remains UK region with highest rate of child poverty (37%).

Budget 2016: the next generation comes second

16 March 2016
Responding to today’s Budget, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said: “This Budget puts the next generation last and set to be the poorest generation for decades. The Chancellor ignored both the 3.7m children in poverty now and the fact that according to IFS projections we face the biggest increase in child poverty in a generation...

Response to SMCP report

17 December 2015
Responding today to today’s Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission report , Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action group Alison Garnham said: “The Commission is right to call for action to boost maternal employment and to raise the minimum wage so fewer people earn less than two thirds of median hourly pay but we need to be clear that cuts in benefits are the key driver of increased child poverty in the UK today...

CPAG's response to David Cameron's speech

07 October 2015
Responding today to the Prime Minister’s Conservative Conference speech today, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham said: “The Prime Minister is absolutely right to recognise that ending UK poverty would be a tremendous social reform and he deserves huge credit for putting poverty, social mobility and equality at the heart of his speech...

Budget U-turn on tax credits and working families

08 July 2015
Responding to today’s budget Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham said: “The welcome move on a higher minimum wage cannot disguise the truth that this is a budget that damages the economic security of working families, and takes us further down the road to being a two-nation economy, with higher child poverty for millions and lower taxes for the better off...