England | CPAG

England

One in four North East pupils living in poverty miss out on Free School Meals

12 May 2021
More than 35,000 pupils in the North East of England who live below the poverty line do not qualify for free school meals under current legislation. A new report, The Cost of Missing Lunchtime, by Children North East, Child Poverty Action Group and the North East Child Poverty Commission reveals one in four children from poorer families in the region are not entitled to a free, nutritious daily meal at school.

The Cost of Missing Lunchtime: A briefing on free school meals in the North East

12 May 2021
New calculations carried out by Child Poverty Action Group, Children North East and the North East Child Poverty Commission show that one in four North East children living below the UK poverty line (over 35,000 children) are not currently eligible for free school meals, and therefore miss out on the many proven benefits associated with the policy. In addition, more than one in ten North East children (11 per cent) who are eligible for free school meals do not take up this offer, meaning they do not benefit from the support that they are entitled to.

Extended school provision

28 April 2021
Schools have a unique place within their communities. With an extended school day, schools can and do support children’s development and learning, support mental health and wellbeing, mitigate the effects of child poverty, and help prevent poverty by supporting parents to work.

Child poverty charities team up with NEU on new resource to help schools fight poverty

26 February 2021
Child Poverty Action Group and Children North East have partnered with the National Education Union (NEU) to publish a new toolkit to help teachers and school staff tackle poverty.

Turning the Page on Poverty: new resource for teachers and school staff

22 February 2021
We've produced a practical resource for educations staff to help tackle poverty and the cost of the school day, in collaboration with Children North East and the National Education Union.

Educational outcomes without secure incomes

17 February 2021
Today, the departing Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, posed an important question in her final speech. She asked how the government can claim to be focused on educational catch-up on the one hand, while at the same time refusing to give families income security and risking more children being pushed into poverty. This is a crucial point. Poverty at home is the strongest statistical predictor of how well a child will do in school.

Digital exclusion during the pandemic

13 January 2021
To solve the immediate issues surrounding digital exclusion, CPAG and Children North East urge the government to rapidly speed up the distribution timetable of the 440,000 purchased devices that are currently available to schools and ensure that every child across England has access to a device for learning and other essential items.

Open letter to Gavin Williamson on home learning

11 January 2021
Today we and Children North East have sent an open letter to the Secretary of State for Education Gavin Williamson MP, which lays out a set of guiding principles that we advise the government to use to make decisions about home education during this lockdown period.

Using COVID-19 funding to tackle child poverty: Guidance for local councils in England

11 January 2021
This guidance aims to support local authorities to consider how any additional funding received to support households struggling during the crisis can best help tackle child poverty, and to spark ideas or stimulate interest in developing new approaches in your local authority area. This may include how to spend unallocated money from the COVID Winter Grant Scheme, but also how support to families is being provided, or could be provided by your local council, outside the remit of this grant. 

Early Warning System E-Bulletin - December 2020

In this edition of the e-bulletin, we provide a brief update on the habitual residence test and the benefit cap, and consider in detail three further topics which emerged over the past month.