UK | CPAG

UK

Pushing back: A take on life in poverty in London

18 October 2019
A group of children, young people and parents with experience of living in a low income in London, have this week launched a new report, Pushing back: Our take on life in poverty in London. The group, known as the ‘A Different Take’, worked with CPAG and the University of Leeds between January and June 2019, to discuss their experiences of living on a low income and to develop their own agenda and solutions. In this blog post, 15-year-old Londoner Beatrice Franks reports on her experience.

Pushing Back: Our take on life in poverty in London

18 October 2019
This report has been developed by the A Different Take London panel. We are a group of children, young people and parents with experience of living on a low income, and people from Child Poverty Action Group and the University of Leeds. Between January-June 2019 we have been discussing our own experiences and priorities and talking to the people in our communities, to develop our own agenda around the most important issues affecting the lives of people in poverty and what we think should be done about them.

Worse off: The impact of universal credit on families in Tower Hamlets

16 October 2019
Tower Hamlets has the highest rate of child poverty in the UK: 57 per cent, after housing costs are taken into account. In 2017, Tower Hamlets became one of the first boroughs in London to become a universal credit ‘full service’ area. The London Borough of Tower Hamlets commissioned CPAG to research the experiences of families with children in receipt of universal credit.

Worse off: The impact of universal credit on families in Tower Hamlets

16 October 2019
We know about the many design problems with universal credit, but what about the impact it has had on families? CPAG and the London Borough of Tower Hamlets have published a new report revealing the experiences of families with children on universal credit in Tower Hamlets, as well as the impact universal credit has had on the local authority and others in the borough. Alice Woudhuysen, author of the report, highlights its key findings.

Social security – where have we been and where are we going?

10 October 2019
As our Secure Futures for Children and Families gets underway, our CEO Alison Garnham looks back and the history of the social security system, what has gone wrong and what the future could look like. 

Understand poverty by talking to all of the experts

10 October 2019
This week sees the UN day for the Eradication of Poverty and London Challenge Poverty Week. One of the events to mark this is the launch of a new study to understand poverty in all its forms in the UK. This blog sets out the key findings only – please check out the full report. The phrase ending poverty in all its forms comes from the Sustainable Development Goals.

Universal credit and lone parents under 25

LR and others v SSWP CO/3678/2019: On 17 September 2019, CPAG filed a judicial review claim challenging the lower standard allowance in universal credit for lone parents who are under 25.

EU pre-settled status

Fratila and Tanase v SSWP CO/3632/2019: On 15 October 2019, CPAG were granted permission by the High Court to bring judicial review proceedings on behalf of two EU nationals who were refused universal credit on the basis that their limited leave to remain in the UK under Appendix EU to the immigration rules (pre-settled status) was not a qualifying right of residence for the purposes of means-tested benefits.

Benefit cap and those paid 4 weekly

Pantellerisco and others v SSWP CO/3572/2019: On 12 September 2019, CPAG issued judicial review proceedings on behalf of a single parent and her children challenging the application of the benefit cap to the mother’s universal credit award despite the fact that she works 16 hours per week at national minimum wage simply because she is paid 4 weekly rather than monthly.

Universal Credit (UC) for 19 year olds in full-time, non-advanced education

This case is a challenge to the UC rules that prevent certain 19 year olds that are in full-time, non-advanced education from being included in their parents’ claim, while they are also prevented from claiming UC in their own right.