Poverty articles

This page contains a selection of articles and editorials from our Poverty journal. Published three times a year, it is sent to all CPAG members as part of the membership package.

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  • The parent trap: promoting poor children’s mental health

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)

    The physical health of children today is arguably the best it has been since the Second World War, with their environments and nutrition substantially improved. However, while their physical health has improved through measures such as immunisation and better access to healthcare, mental health problems among children have increased.

  • Mind the gap: New Labour’s legacy on child poverty

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    "What have the Romans ever done for us?" asked the People’s Front of Judea in the Life of Brian’s fictional recording of ungrateful subjects ignoring their rulers’ largesse.

  • What should be done next?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    Child poverty is not a discrete social problem that can be eradicated without tackling wider inequalities of income and wealth. As the recent National Equality Panel report demonstrates, earnings, income and wealth are all distributed highly unequally, thereby undermining the goal of ‘equality of opportunity’ for children espoused by the main political parties. Social class interacts with other social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and disability to shape the contours of poverty and inequality. Ruth Lister argues that a multi-pronged (gendered) strategy is required, which explicitly aims to create a more equal society within which all children can flourish.

  • The child poverty strategy: what worked?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    Over the past decade, the UK has embarked on an ambitious effort to end child poverty. Jane Waldfogel has tracked the progress of the initiative and reports on it in her new book, Britain’s War on Poverty . Here, she provides some highlights of her study and suggests some next steps.

  • A false economy: undervaluing childcare

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

    The provision of high-quality, affordable and accessible childcare lies at the heart of the Government’s child poverty strategy. And yet childcare as a profession is undervalued. This illustrates a system-wide problem, in which the most valuable occupations to society are among the lowest paid, while those which may be damaging to society, the environment and the economy, may be among the highest paid. Helen Kersley outlines research findings from two reports which take a radically different look at child poverty.

  • Child poverty: political consensus or electoral battleground?

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

    There is now a political consensus now exists that high levels of child poverty in the UK are unacceptable. However, while all three parties support the Child Poverty Bill and its commitment to eradicate child poverty by 2020, differences of interpretation and approach are emerging about the causes of poverty and how best to reduce it.

  • Supporting families

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

    Supporting the family is key to both the Government’s and the Conservatives’ approach to eradicating child poverty, and is one of the major issues on which the election is likely to be fought. But are the underlying assumptions about the family that are driving current policies correct, and are they being implemented effectively?

  • Obituary: Sir Henry Hodge

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    Obituary of Sir Henry Hodge, 12 January 1944 – 18 June 2009, by Roger Smith, Director, JUSTICE

  • The Child Poverty Bill: a guide

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    The Child Poverty Bill was first announced by Gordon Brown in September 2008, and introduced to Parliament in July 2009. Not only does the Bill have the support from all three major political parties, but CPAG and other organisations concerned about child poverty have welcomed it. Paul Dornan outlines what it contains.

  • Tackling in-work poverty

    Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

    A few years ago, the concept of ‘in-work poverty’ was relatively unheard of. When the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) first report on the subject was published in early 2007, the simple statistic that nearly half of all poor children lived in working families was enough to make headlines in nearly every national newspaper. Since then, further work by IPPR, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and others has pushed in-work poverty up the agenda and it is now firmly recognised as a key piece in the poverty puzzle.