Poverty articles

This page contains a selection of articles and editorials from our Poverty journal. Published three times a year, it is sent to all CPAG members as part of the membership package.

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  • The impact of poverty on the educational experiences of migrant children

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    Although migrants are a diverse group in terms of their employment and earnings, their children are disproportionally represented among those living in poverty in the UK. Poverty impacts on migrant children’s educational outcomes, but also on their social experiences at school. Child poverty also limits the chances of inter-generational mobility among migrants and, in some communities, poor labour market outcomes are becoming entrenched.

  • Welfare benefits, housing and social services

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    Ignorance on the part of central and local government officials, exacerbated by the pressure of budget constraints, make migrants and their families particularly vulnerable to being unlawfully refused access to welfare benefits, housing and social services. This article is part of a special Poverty issue (no. 138) on migration, migrants and child poverty.

  • The health and healthcare of vulnerable migrant children

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    Many different groups of migrant children may be at particular risk of poor health and limited access to healthcare. These include unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (who have applied for asylum in their own right) and children who are dependants of asylum-seeking adults,

  • The effect of fiscal tightening on family incomes and child poverty

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)

    A new report from the Institute for Fiscal Studies shows that the Coalition Government’s Emergency Budget hit families with children hardest. Here, Mike Brewer, James Browne and Peter Levell summarise the analysis of who will bear the brunt of the Government’s deficit-busting plans.

  • The parent trap: promoting poor children’s mental health

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)

    The physical health of children today is arguably the best it has been since the Second World War, with their environments and nutrition substantially improved. However, while their physical health has improved through measures such as immunisation and better access to healthcare, mental health problems among children have increased.

  • Work: the best route out of poverty?

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)

    Ever since New Labour first set the welfare reform bandwagon in motion in 2006, the mantra of work has been used by all sides of the political spectrum as ‘proof’ that the benefits system is in need of large-scale reform.

  • Mind the gap: New Labour’s legacy on child poverty

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    "What have the Romans ever done for us?" asked the People’s Front of Judea in the Life of Brian’s fictional recording of ungrateful subjects ignoring their rulers’ largesse.

  • What should be done next?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    Child poverty is not a discrete social problem that can be eradicated without tackling wider inequalities of income and wealth. As the recent National Equality Panel report demonstrates, earnings, income and wealth are all distributed highly unequally, thereby undermining the goal of ‘equality of opportunity’ for children espoused by the main political parties. Social class interacts with other social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and disability to shape the contours of poverty and inequality. Ruth Lister argues that a multi-pronged (gendered) strategy is required, which explicitly aims to create a more equal society within which all children can flourish.

  • The child poverty strategy: what worked?

    Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

    Over the past decade, the UK has embarked on an ambitious effort to end child poverty. Jane Waldfogel has tracked the progress of the initiative and reports on it in her new book, Britain’s War on Poverty . Here, she provides some highlights of her study and suggests some next steps.

  • A false economy: undervaluing childcare

    Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

    The provision of high-quality, affordable and accessible childcare lies at the heart of the Government’s child poverty strategy. And yet childcare as a profession is undervalued. This illustrates a system-wide problem, in which the most valuable occupations to society are among the lowest paid, while those which may be damaging to society, the environment and the economy, may be among the highest paid. Helen Kersley outlines research findings from two reports which take a radically different look at child poverty.