Our policy journal

Published three times a year, Poverty journal carries articles and features to inform, stimulate and develop debate about the nature and causes of poverty. Each issue includes three in-depth features, reviews of latest poverty research, analysis of child poverty statistics, and views from practitioners and young people themselves.

This page contains a selection of articles and editorials from each issue. Access to the full content is part of CPAG’s membership package.

Please note the views expressed in articles are not necessarily those of CPAG. We welcome articles and other contributions from our readers – if you are interested, please contact the editor at jtucker@cpag.org.uk.

  • Universal credit: the gender impact

    Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)

    The government’s plans to introduce a new universal credit are intended to improve work incentives and simplify a complex benefits system, but may work against its duty to promote gender equality. Here, Fran Bennett, drawing on work for the Women’s Budget Group, looks at the impact the new benefit may have on gender issues, in particular on financial autonomy for women.

  • Riots, redistribution and reparation

    Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)

    Many people have asked why a tiny proportion of (mostly) young people rioted this summer. They have also questioned the part that rising inequalities could have played in making many people poor and some angry. After all, young adults in Britain today have only ever known a country in which income and wealth have been redistributed from poor to rich – to the detriment of all. How much money could be saved by doing the reverse and redistributing from rich to poor? And how much reparation is required in the long run for a sense eventually to emerge that we are all in this together? Danny Dorling seeks answers from an eclectic mix of sources, including a Chinese daily newspaper, a former London gang member and the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

  • End of a Faustian pact: workfare and riots

    Issue 140 (Autumn 2011)

    During the past three decades, Guy Standing argues, politicians struck a Faustian pact. In return for ‘labour market flexibility’, government would top up declining wages through subsidies and tax credits and redirect social protection from an emphasis on social solidarity and social insurance to means-tested social assistance. In the aftermath of rioting, they must now face the following fact: it is the economic policies they have supported that are a major cause of the underlying malaise.

  • Child benefits in the European Union

    Issue 139 (Summer 2011)

    The future of a universal child benefit in the UK is currently under threat. Here Jonathan Bradshaw looks at how the UK compares with other European Union countries in its provision of child benefits

  • Trying to get by: children and young people talk about poverty

    Issue 139 (Summer 2011)

    What does poverty mean for the children and young people themselves? Why are their voices missing from the current debate? In this article, Kerry Martin and Ruth Hart discuss the findings from a qualitative research project that reports on what children and young people have to say about the impact that poverty has on their lives.

  • Can welfare reform work?

    Issue 139 (Summer 2011)

    Since the late 1990s, successive governments have engaged in the process of welfare reform. A cross-party consensus has emerged, which prioritises moving benefit recipients into work and increasing the role of private and voluntary providers in delivering employment services. Sharon Wright outlines the pros and cons of this approach.

  • Migration, migrants and child poverty

    Issue 138 (summer 2011)

    Although international migration has always been a feature of national life, this aspect of population change has increased over the last twenty years.  While many migrant families have a reasonable income and a few are very prosperous, migrant children are disproportionally represented among children living in poverty.

  • Destitution among refugee and asylum-seeking children

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    Fleeing from persecution to seek protection in a different country places already vulnerable families in a precarious position. Often families are forced to live on amounts that fall far short of providing for their basic needs and which place them well below the poverty line as their asylum claim is processed, which can take several months or even years.

  • Employment and migrant poverty

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    The issue of migrant poverty and employment is complex and migrants’ experiences in the UK differ enormously. While some of these variations stem from the uniqueness of individual experience, others relate to the migrant’s particular immigration status and her/his associated right to reside in the UK and to access work.

  • The impact of poverty on the educational experiences of migrant children

    Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

    Although migrants are a diverse group in terms of their employment and earnings, their children are disproportionally represented among those living in poverty in the UK. Poverty impacts on migrant children’s educational outcomes, but also on their social experiences at school. Child poverty also limits the chances of inter-generational mobility among migrants and, in some communities, poor labour market outcomes are becoming entrenched.