Our policy journal

Published three times a year, Poverty journal carries articles and features to inform, stimulate and develop debate about the nature and causes of poverty. Each issue includes three in-depth features, reviews of latest poverty research, analysis of child poverty statistics, and views from practitioners and young people themselves.

This page contains a selection of articles and editorials from each issue. Access to the full content is part of CPAG’s membership package.

Please note the views expressed in articles are not necessarily those of CPAG. We welcome articles and other contributions from our readers – if you are interested, please contact the editor at jtucker@cpag.org.uk.

  • Tackling child poverty in London primary schools

    Poverty 163 (Summer 2019)

    The impact of poverty on children’s education is well documented and many schools are now developing initiatives to support children and families who are living on a low income. Here, Sophie Howes describes CPAG’s new project, which explores the role schools can play in alleviating child poverty.

    Read the article

    More from Poverty 163

  • What does Brexit mean for social policy in the UK?

    Poverty 163 (Summer 2019)

    The expected date for Britain to leave the European Union, March 29 2019, has come and gone, but the nature of the UK’s future relationship with the European Union remains uncertain. One thing is clear, however. The eventual outcome of the current deadlock will shape policy options and lived experience in the UK for many years to come. Kitty Stewart, Kerris Cooper and Isabel Shutes present the findings of a recent project mapping out some potential consequences.

  • Editorial: Poverty 163

    Poverty 163 (Summer 2019)

    Spring saw the release of new poverty figures for the UK. This year they did not show a rise on the main headline measure we use (relative child poverty after housing costs), but did show alarming jumps in so-called ‘absolute’ child poverty (which compares incomes with where families were in 2010/11), in poverty among children with two or more siblings, and in the number of children in severe poverty.

  • Sustainable Development Goals and poverty in the UK

    Poverty 163 (Summer 2019)

    The United Nations’ Agenda 2030 was agreed at a global level in 2015. It set out 17 ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ on a range of social and environmental issues, to be achieved by all countries. Fran Bennett examines progress in the UK – in particular, in relation to the ambitious aims to reduce poverty in all signatory countries, not just the global south.

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  • Poverty and children’s wellbeing at 14 years old

    Poverty 162 (Winter 2019)

    It is well established that children who live in low-income families have poorer than average cognitive and emotional development, educational attainment and physical health. Less is known about the possible cumulative impacts of persistent poverty during childhood on later outcomes, particularly in adolescence, and the links between other forms of poverty and child wellbeing. Gwyther Rees addresses these gaps.

    More articles from Poverty 162

  • Editorial: Poverty 162

    Poverty 162 (Winter 2019)

    Keeping child poverty on the agenda

    We start the year with all the headlines and most of the political oxygen being taken up by Brexit, which everyone is agreed is likely to drive up the cost of essentials, piling more misery on top of years of austerity for people managing on a low income. What is also clear is that the preoccupation with Brexit has squeezed many other issues not only out of the news, but off the political agenda, with promised plans and legislation across a variety of departments kicked into the long grass.

    Articles in this issue:

  • UK child poverty gaps are still increasing

    Poverty 162 (Winter 2019)

    The UK child poverty rate has been rising for several years. But it is also important to understand how far families and children are falling below the poverty line. Deeper poverty generally means greater hardship and more profound consequences for children. Jonathan Bradshaw and Antonia Keung analyse the official data using eight different measures, to show that not only is the child poverty rate rising, but the depth of child poverty is too.

    More articles from Poverty 162

  • Mitigation of welfare reform in Northern Ireland: on a cliff edge

    Poverty 162 (Winter 2019)

    The planned implementation of welfare reform brought the Northern Ireland Assembly to the brink of collapse in 2015 due to political concerns about the impact of the major changes on vulnerable people. Following negotiations between the parties and with the government, the ‘fresh start agreement’ was passed. This led to the introduction of a £585 million welfare reform mitigations package designed to lessen the impact of some of the harshest aspects of the new system. The package is due to expire in 2020 and concerns are mounting about a subsequent ‘cliff edge’.

  • Welfare reform summit

    Issue 161 (Winter 2018)

    In April this year Staffordshire University hosted a welfare reform summit, funded by the Social Policy Association and delivered in partnership with CPAG and the Centre for Health and Development. The aim of the summit  was to explore the impact of welfare reform on claimants and the organisations that support them. Over 80 delegates attended from a wide range of backgrounds, including welfare rights and housing professionals, and social policy academics and students. A series of workshops gave delegates the opportunity to share their experience. Richard Machin, Dan Norris and Professor Martin Jones discuss the issues raised.

  • Rough justice: problems with universal credit assessment periods

    Issue 161 (Winter 2018)

    One in twenty universal credit cases submitted to CPAG’s Early Warning System to date relates to a problem with the way in which people’s income and circumstances are assessed on a strict monthly basis. Josephine Tucker discusses some of the problems which can arise, and provides possible solutions.