Remembering Peter Townsend

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Obituary of Peter Townsend, one of CPAG's founders and our president, born 6 April 1928, died 7 June 2009.

Child poverty and child wellbeing

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Enhancing children's lives and improving child wellbeing should be the central objective of any children's policy. But what do we mean by 'wellbeing'? Here, Paul Dornan draws on recently published research from the University of York to explore different aspects of child wellbeing and what they mean for policy in the UK.

Transmitting deprivation? The media and public attitudes towards poverty

Issue 133 (Summer 2009)

Poverty in the UK does not appear to be a priority issue for the mainstream UK media, and the picture of poverty the media does provide is skewed towards certain issues and representations. Building support for the reforms necessary to reduce poverty significantly in the UK requires understanding the influence of the media in shaping public perceptions. Stephen Sinclair and John H McKendrick describe their recent research.

Obituary: Sir Henry Hodge

Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

Obituary of Sir Henry Hodge, 12 January 1944 – 18 June 2009, by Roger Smith, Director, JUSTICE

The Child Poverty Bill: a guide

Issue 134 (Autumn 2009)

The Child Poverty Bill was first announced by Gordon Brown in September 2008, and introduced to Parliament in July 2009. Not only does the Bill have the support from all three major political parties, but CPAG and other organisations concerned about child poverty have welcomed it. Paul Dornan outlines what it contains.

A false economy: undervaluing childcare

Issue 135 (Winter 2010)

The provision of high-quality, affordable and accessible childcare lies at the heart of the Government’s child poverty strategy. And yet childcare as a profession is undervalued. This illustrates a system-wide problem, in which the most valuable occupations to society are among the lowest paid, while those which may be damaging to society, the environment and the economy, may be among the highest paid. Helen Kersley outlines research findings from two reports which take a radically different look at child poverty.

What should be done next?

Issue 136 (Summer 2010)

Child poverty is not a discrete social problem that can be eradicated without tackling wider inequalities of income and wealth. As the recent National Equality Panel report demonstrates, earnings, income and wealth are all distributed highly unequally, thereby undermining the goal of ‘equality of opportunity’ for children espoused by the main political parties. Social class interacts with other social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and disability to shape the contours of poverty and inequality. Ruth Lister argues that a multi-pronged (gendered) strategy is required, which explicitly aims to create a more equal society within which all children can flourish.

Destitution among refugee and asylum-seeking children

Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

Fleeing from persecution to seek protection in a different country places already vulnerable families in a precarious position. Often families are forced to live on amounts that fall far short of providing for their basic needs and which place them well below the poverty line as their asylum claim is processed, which can take several months or even years.

Employment and migrant poverty

Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

The issue of migrant poverty and employment is complex and migrants’ experiences in the UK differ enormously. While some of these variations stem from the uniqueness of individual experience, others relate to the migrant’s particular immigration status and her/his associated right to reside in the UK and to access work.

The impact of poverty on the educational experiences of migrant children

Issue 138 (Spring 2011)

Although migrants are a diverse group in terms of their employment and earnings, their children are disproportionally represented among those living in poverty in the UK. Poverty impacts on migrant children’s educational outcomes, but also on their social experiences at school. Child poverty also limits the chances of inter-generational mobility among migrants and, in some communities, poor labour market outcomes are becoming entrenched.