Campaigning on child poverty: the New Zealand experience

Issue 153 (Winter 2016)

New Zealand is traditionally regarded as a quiet, safe, egalitarian country with nothing in it more dangerous than a few hobbits. The reality, however, is that between the mid-1980s and the mid-2000s, it experienced the biggest increase in the gap between the rich and the rest of any developed country. The result is that, as the economy has delivered a growing share of national income to the rich, there has been relatively little for the rest to share. Levels of poverty, and child poverty in particular, have increased dramatically in the last 30 years. Here, Max Rashbrooke assesses the impact of New Zealand’s Child Poverty Action Group and other campaigners working to reverse this trend, and uncovers some familiar issues.

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