work

  • Moving to The London Living Wage: A Guide for Local Authorities in London


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    This is a practical, comprehensive guide from CPAG and the Living Wage Foundation, which aims to help local authorities in London become accredited Living Wage employers.

    The guide explains:

  • Submission to Greater London Authority on Low Pay and London Living Wage

    August 2013
    briefing

    CPAG sets out our views on how to tackle low pay and encourage take up of the London Living Wage in a submission to the Greater London Authority's economy committee.

  • Missing potential: why the European funds should be used to support parental employment in London

    June 2013
    briefing

    London has the highest child poverty rates in the country, and the lowest rates of mothers employment. This briefing argues that the next round of the European Social Fund from 2014 should be used in London to support parents to access paid work.

  • 'Mini-jobs' for lone parents?

    Issue 128 (Autumn 2007)
    article

    Juggling work and childcare is the big conundrum of being a lone parent. But as the Government increasingly promotes work as the best way out of poverty, lone parents have little to choose from. Now however, new research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has found that working in a so-called 'mini-job' for under 16 hours a week could be the way to bring lone parents gradually back into full-time employment while also allowing them to adjust their childcare needs. But are the advantages to lone parents real ones? What happens once benefit cuts are taken into account? Kate Bell considers the different options, as well as whether the strategy could contribute to achieving the Government's target of halving child poverty for 2010.

  • Autumn Statement creates new rationing system for children, working families and disabled people

    December 5, 2013
    press release

    Responding to today’s Autumn Statement, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “Today’s Autumn Statement creates a new income rationing system for children, working families and disabled people through a national cap on their basic support.

    Read more
  • EU court upholds equality for pregnant workers

    June 19, 2014
    press release

    A landmark ruling today from the EU’s highest court has upheld the rights of pregnant EU nationals to equal treatment when claiming benefits.   The European Court of Justice ruled that a French national who was working in the UK and had to give up work because of the late stages of pregnancy should be entitled to income support.

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  • First thoughts on the ‘National Living Wage’


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    A substantial increase in the National Minimum Wage for over-25s (or National Living Wage, as Osborne’s re-badging has it) can only be a good thing for low-paid workers. It should be celebrated. That much, at least, is clear.

  • Response to announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate

    October 31, 2016
    press release

    Responding today to the announcement of the 2016-17 London Living Wage rate, Child Poverty Action Group Chief Executive Alison Garnham said:

    “A London Living Wage rate for 2016-17 of £9.75 is a beacon of good news on a pretty grim horizon for the capital's families. 4 in 10 London children live in poverty, over half of these children live in a family where someone is in work so the London Living Wage provides an important mechanism to reduce in-work poverty in London.

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  • Work and low pay


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    On both the right and left, many view paid employment as the solution to poverty. Work has a range of benefits: it provides not just income but also the chance to improve skills, to develop networks, and the opportunity to act as a good role model for children. However, work does not always prove to be the answer to poverty that many claim it can be.

  • Work: the best route out of poverty?

    Issue 137 (Autumn 2010)
    article

    Ever since New Labour first set the welfare reform bandwagon in motion in 2006, the mantra of work has been used by all sides of the political spectrum as ‘proof’ that the benefits system is in need of large-scale reform.