local welfare provision

  • "The last backstop for the most vulnerable": what now for local welfare schemes?

    Announcing the provisional local government finance settlement yesterday, Kris Hopkins made things sound just rosy for local welfare provision. A £129.6 million allocation for the successor schemes to the social fund next year? Happy Christmas, one and all.

  • Child Poverty Action Group criticises local welfare decision

    December 18, 2014
    press release

    Child Poverty Action Group has criticised the Government’s decision to maintain the cut in funding for local welfare assistance schemes (LWAs), announced today by Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Kris Hopkins in the Provisional Local Government Finance Settlement.

    The council-run schemes succeeded the Social Fund in 2013 and can grant moderate amounts to people in critical need. (1)

    Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

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  • CPAG responds to local welfare decision

    February 3, 2015
    press release

    Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) has welcomed the partial restoration of central government funding for Local Welfare Assistance schemes (LWAs) - the successor to the Social Fund – and hopes the funding levels of recent years will be restored in the near future.

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  • CPAG welcomes government decision on local assistance schemes

    September 16, 2014
    press release

    Responding today to the government’s decision to reconsider how to fund local welfare assistance schemes in 2015/16, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    “We welcome that the government has recognised the importance of local welfare assistance schemes and has committed to undertake a thorough review and consultation before deciding how the schemes will be funded in future.

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  • Save our safety net

    This blog first appeared on Liberal Democrat Voice.

    Four children are left home alone for five days. Social services step in to move the kids out to live with their father. But there’s a problem: the council have found a flat for the newly formed family, but it is unfurnished. The dad lives on a low income and does not have the savings to buy five beds and mattresses, and all the other furniture that is needed.

  • Shredding the safety net to our national safety net

    The UK’s social security system has long recognised that benefit levels are not sufficient for claimants to build up savings and manage unexpected or one-off costs. However, from April 2015, there will be no source of funding for this.

  • The dark side of localism: when boroughs want to keep "council tax tourists" out

    In the 1949 Ealing comedy Passport to Pimlico, residents of the London borough set themselves up as a separate state with predictably comic results. When Pimlico’s governing committee lifts post-war rationing, shoppers flood to the new dominion only to find themselves trapped when its borders are later closed. As the local policeman puts it to one hapless refugee, “You should never have travelled abroad without your passport, madam”.

  • The future of Local Welfare Assistance Schemes

    This week, the government committed to making a fresh decision on how Local Welfare Assistance Schemes (LWAS) (also called Local Welfare Provision) will be funded in 2015/16. Their decision will be informed by a thorough examination of how schemes are functioning, and the needs of those that benefit from them - great news for the vulnerable people that rely on them in times of need.

  • The importance of local welfare assistance

    Maria is one of thousands of parents up and down the country who have received support from their council through local welfare provision funding. She was living with her abusive partner and her child, with no access to the household’s money, and no family in the country.

  • What do experts and professionals think of the ‘local welfare safety net’?

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    Does local discretion on social security deliver ‘localism in action’ or a postcode lottery? That’s one of the questions being asked by the Commons Work and Pensions select committee in looking at the interaction between the national benefits system and locally-run schemes.