cost of a child

  • The cost of a child

    Issue 152 (Autumn 2015)
    article

    Since 2012, Child Poverty Action Group and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation have been measuring the cost of a child and the adequacy of family incomes and benefit levels. This year, for the first time, the project also assessed the additional costs facing families in London. Josephine Tucker provides a rundown of this year’s findings.

  • Cost of a child 2015


    page

    CPAG's annual research conducted by Donald Hirsch, Director for the Centre for Research on Social Policy, on the cost of bringing up a child found that parents both in and out of work are struggling to meet the minimum family costs.

    The Cost of a Child 2015 finds the minimum cost of a child from birth to age 18 remains high at £149,805 (a 1.6% increase on 2014 and a 5% increase since 2012).

  • The cost of a child in 2014


    page

    The cost of bringing up children is a crucial factor affecting family wellbeing and poverty. Many parents find it hard to afford the additional expense that children bring, while often having less disposable income because of caring responsibilities or care costs.

    In 2014, the UK economy is starting to grow after the longest period of shrinkage and stagnation in recent times. In these difficult years, families have become less able to afford an adequate living standard, as the cost of bringing up a child has risen much faster than earnings, while help from the state to cover these costs has shrunk. Although wages are now forecast to start growing again, in real terms, the uprating of family benefits and tax credits has been capped at a level below inflation. This means that the reduced living standards being experienced by families on low incomes is not only persisting, but could continue to get worse.

  • The cost of a child in 2014

    August 2014
    briefing

    Today we publish our third annual report ‘The Cost of a Child in 2014’, written by Donald Hirsch from the Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University and funded by JRF. It draws on the Minimum Income Standard project (MIS) to establish how much families need to cover their basic needs like food, clothes and shelter, and to participate in society.

  • The Cost of a Child in 2013

    August 2013
    briefing

    Cost of a Child in 2013

    This report shows parents struggled more than ever to provide a decent standard of living for their families in 2013. This is the second in a series of annual reports on the cost of bringing up a child in the UK. 

  • The cost of a child

    Issue 143 (Autumn 2012)
    article

    How much does it cost to bring up a child, free of material hardship and social disadvantage, in the UK today? How should these costs be measured and what costs should be included? And how adequate is the benefits system in meeting the cost of children? Donald Hirsch draws on his latest work to provide some answers.

  • Cost of a Child 2012

    September 2012
    briefing

    At a time when many families are finding it hard to make ends meet, how much does it cost to bring up a child to meet their needs to a decent minimum standard? This report from CPAG, funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, answers that question to show for the first time in a robust way how much it costs to provide children with a minimum level of participation in society, as well as catering for their needs in terms of food, clothes and shelter.

  • CPAG welcome announcement on childcare and early years pupil premium investment

    March 18, 2014
    press release

    In response to the Government's announcement that 85% of childcare costs will be met in Universal Credit and that there will be a £50 million Early Years Pupil Premium funding for the most disadvantaged three and four year olds, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of the Child Poverty Action Group, said:

    Read more
  • Fair for who? Child maintenance and family tests.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has announced that he wants to see all domestic government policies subjected to a ‘family test’ in future, apparently to ensure that families aren’t undermined or made worse off financially.  But does the ‘family test’ itself pass the test?

    Initially at least, it may be difficult to understand why anyone would be against such an approach. Indeed, we have been arguing that government should pay attention to a wide range of policy areas, such as employment, benefits, and family support services, to reduce child poverty and help improve the lot of poor families for many years.

    One concern, however, is that it’s unclear whether the proposed ‘family test’ applies to lone parent families, too.

  • Families continue to struggle as cost of a child increases

    August 12, 2014
    press release

    Families working full time at the national minimum wage are 18 per cent short of the basic amount needed to provide themselves a minimum standard of living according to the new report ‘The Cost of a Child in 2014’ published today by Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) and funded by Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF). The shortfall for out-of-work families is even more stark, standing at 43 per cent.

    Read more