childcare

  • EXTENDED SCHOOLS FAILING TO MEET PARENTS’ CHILDCARE NEEDS

    September 14, 2016
    press release

    Out-of-school services are failing to match parents’ need for afterschool and holiday childcare a new report (1) from Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) and the Family and Childcare Trust warns.

    Almost two fifths (39%) of schools surveyed for the report said parents wanted holiday provision but only 29% of schools offered this. For afterschool childcare the shortfall was 11 percentage points, with only just over half of schools providing this. The mismatch was biggest in primary schools.

    Drawing on surveys of more than 1,000 head teachers and of 1,200 children, the study found that extended schools are popular with children and schools, but lack of resources was preventing them from expanding.

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  • Fair for who? Child maintenance and family tests.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has announced that he wants to see all domestic government policies subjected to a ‘family test’ in future, apparently to ensure that families aren’t undermined or made worse off financially.  But does the ‘family test’ itself pass the test?

    Initially at least, it may be difficult to understand why anyone would be against such an approach. Indeed, we have been arguing that government should pay attention to a wide range of policy areas, such as employment, benefits, and family support services, to reduce child poverty and help improve the lot of poor families for many years.

    One concern, however, is that it’s unclear whether the proposed ‘family test’ applies to lone parent families, too.

  • Free childcare for 140,000 two year olds will help address child poverty

    November 11, 2011
    press release

    Responding to the details announced today by the Deputy Prime Minster of the extension of free childcare for 2 year olds in economically disadvantaged households, the Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said:

    “The government’s child poverty strategy needs to be a broad approach, with action on early years an essential element alongside decent welfare benefits, fair pay and high quality services.

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  • Government abandons low income families in child poverty u-turn

    November 29, 2011
    press release

    Responding to the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, the Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said:

    “Britain’s poorest families have been abandoned today and left to face the worst. The increase in child tax credit that the Chancellor said last year was there to stop child poverty rising for at least two years has been cancelled today.

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  • London families need jobs they can raise a family on

    October 20, 2011
    press release

    In response to the publication of the London Poverty Profile published today by the Trust for London, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said:

    “This valuable, in-depth report is the latest to spell out the extent and the depth of poverty facing London’s children.

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  • New government announcement on childcare

    19 March 2013
    news

    The government has today announced a new scheme, to start in three years' time, to give tax relief to families for childcare costs.

    However, CPAG is concerned that it would do very little to help the families that need it most, or to reduce child poverty.

    See press release for our full response.

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  • Overhyped Budget does little for families

    April 27, 2012
    press release

    Key points from Budget 2012:

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  • QUEEN’S SPEECH: CHILD POVERTY ACTION GROUP RESPONSE

    June 21, 2017
    press release
    • Welcome shelving of plans to cut universal free school meals
    • No plans for tackling rising child poverty, despite promise to tackle ‘burning injustice’ of poverty
    • Urgent need for a coherent social justice agenda

    Alison Garnham, Chief Executive:

    “We welcome the commitments to strengthen rights at work and the minimum wage for over 25-year-olds, but this is a Queen's Speech conspicuous for what it doesn’t mention and suggests the Government is missing a serious and coherent social justice agenda.

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  • Tax-free childcare - what's in it for low-income families?

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    By Mark Willis, Welfare Rights Adviser at CPAG in Scotland

    The government has been busy promoting its new tax-free childcare scheme, with its own Twitter hashtag, infographics on Flickr, and even a Facebook photo album. These proudly boast that a working family with two children can save up to £4,000 a year. The ‘top ten things to know about tax-free childcare’ announces the scheme will be simpler, fairer, and available to families earning over £52 a week and not more than £150,000 per year. However, low income families need to know that tax-free childcare offers them nothing - and could even leave them significantly worse off if they apply for it.

  • Why we need a 'triple lock' on children's benefits


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    Four in ten Londoners in families aren’t able to afford a minimum standard of living. For lone parent families, this rises to two thirds.

    These were the findings of new research as part of the Minimum Income Standards (MIS) project from Loughborough University, funded by Trust for London. This work is based on a series of focus groups where members of the public reach a consensus on what is needed, not only to ensure survival, but “in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.”