child poverty

  • Cost of the School Day research published

    October 2, 2015
    press release

    Children and young people from low income families in Glasgow can find that costs across the school day act as a barrier to their participation at school. This can make pupils feel excluded and in some cases, may have a direct result on their ability to achieve, research has found.

    The research findings from a unique, year-long pilot project in Glasgow looking at the impact of poverty on the lives of children and young people and their access to an education will be published on Friday 2 October.

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  • CPAG responds to the Autumn Statement

    5 December 2013
    news

    We have criticised the Chancellor's Autumn Statement for rationing support for children, working families and disabled people through a national cap on social security.

    See our full reaction in the CPAG press statement.

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  • CPAG welcome announcement on childcare and early years pupil premium investment

    March 18, 2014
    press release

    In response to the Government's announcement that 85% of childcare costs will be met in Universal Credit and that there will be a £50 million Early Years Pupil Premium funding for the most disadvantaged three and four year olds, Alison Garnham, Chief Executive of the Child Poverty Action Group, said:

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  • Emergency Budget: CPAG's letter to the Chancellor

    June 2010
    briefing

    CPAG has written to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rt Hon George Osborne, in the run-up to the Emergency Budget on 22 June 2010. Our letter details the action needed to ensure that:

    • measures taken against the deficit are fair towards low income families;
    • progress is made towards the Government's goal of ending child poverty by 2010.
  • Ending child poverty: a right or a responsibility?

    Issue 142 (Summer 2012)
    article

    This year the European Union will publish its Recommendation on Child Poverty. This is expected to be based on three ‘pillars’ – access to adequate resources, access to services and opportunities, and children’s participation – and to argue for a strong rights-based approach to eradicating child poverty. In 2011, the current coalition administration published the first government child poverty strategy in the UK. At its heart, lies a commitment to ‘strengthening families, encouraging responsibility, promoting work, guaranteeing fairness and providing support to the most vulnerable’. Stephen Crossley and Tracy Shildrick explore these two very different approaches.

  • EU court upholds equality for pregnant workers

    June 19, 2014
    press release

    A landmark ruling today from the EU’s highest court has upheld the rights of pregnant EU nationals to equal treatment when claiming benefits.   The European Court of Justice ruled that a French national who was working in the UK and had to give up work because of the late stages of pregnancy should be entitled to income support.

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  • Experts warn massive reductions in UK child poverty may be reversed by Coalition

    June 11, 2012
    press release

    The child poverty approach pursued between 1998 and 2010 was broad-based, made a significant and long-lasting difference to families with children and reduced child poverty on a scale and at a pace unmatched by other industrial nations during the period.

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  • Fair for who? Child maintenance and family tests.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has announced that he wants to see all domestic government policies subjected to a ‘family test’ in future, apparently to ensure that families aren’t undermined or made worse off financially.  But does the ‘family test’ itself pass the test?

    Initially at least, it may be difficult to understand why anyone would be against such an approach. Indeed, we have been arguing that government should pay attention to a wide range of policy areas, such as employment, benefits, and family support services, to reduce child poverty and help improve the lot of poor families for many years.

    One concern, however, is that it’s unclear whether the proposed ‘family test’ applies to lone parent families, too.

  • Family budgets hit by ‘Bad Friday’ bombshell

    April 4, 2012
    press release

    Commenting on the multi-billion pound cuts set to hit ordinary families on Good Friday, the Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group, Alison Garnham, said:

    “This year’s holiday will feel more like ‘Bad Friday’ for millions of families as they come to terms with over £2 billion of cuts.

    “Some of the poorest working families will lose thousands of pounds from their annual income, leaving them in a desperate struggle to pay for basics like groceries, clothes and household bills.

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  • Family finances hit by £2.3 billion bombshell in April

    April 1, 2013
    press release

    Low income households will have their family finances hit by multiple cuts this month. The main cuts are:

    1. Bedroom Tax (housing benefit penalties for excess rooms in social sector) - £490m
    2. Council tax benefit localised and devolved budgets cut by 10% - £485m
    3. Local housing allowance annual uprate at CPI (instead of RPI) - £90m
    4. Benefit cap introduced - £290m
    5. Tax credit disregard for in-year increases reduced to £5,000 - £455m
    6. Working age benefits and tax credits: uprating capped at 1% - £505m

    Total losses - £2,315m

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