Moussa Haddad's blog

The UK set for the biggest increase in child poverty in a generation


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The IFS today reports on its projections for poverty levels both now and looking forward to 2020. Its findings are in keeping with those from the Resolution Foundation in the autumn. The IFS projects a 50 per cent increase in relative child poverty – from 17.0 per cent in 2014-15 to 25.7 per cent in 2020-21 – and an increase in absolute child poverty from 16.7 per cent in 2014-15 to 18.3 per cent in 2020-21.

Small steps forward on sanctions

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In many ways, benefit sanctions offer the holy grail of public policy: the opportunity to find small changes that make a big difference, at little or no cost to the public purse.

How should we measure poverty?


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This blog first appeared on Bright Blue

The Resolution Foundation: 200,000 more children in poverty next year


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The Resolution Foundation made the news last week with their estimates of the impact on child poverty of the Summer Budget.

Poverty estimates

First thoughts on the ‘National Living Wage’


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A substantial increase in the National Minimum Wage for over-25s (or National Living Wage, as Osborne’s re-badging has it) can only be a good thing for low-paid workers. It should be celebrated. That much, at least, is clear.

Child benefit and the fight against poverty


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Child benefit is one of the strongest tools we have in reducing poverty, and it is vital that it is protected. But it can’t do the job on its own. We urgently need a comprehensive, action-focused strategy for reducing and then ending child poverty. The road ahead is long, and so we must start by protecting what we already have.

The first 100 days - what should a progressive government implement?


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CLASS - The First 100 DaysWe contributed an essay to a new publication by the Centre for Labour and Social Studies: The first 100 days - what should a progressive government implement? 

How the rising cost of essentials has tightened the squeeze on family incomes


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"New research suggests that benefit cuts, harsher benefit rules and the rising costs of essentials are all hitting poor families in the UK at the same time. This can only serve to reinforce the urgency of making sure people on low incomes are protected." 

New evidence shows people use food banks due to the negative effects of welfare reform

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"What is driving food bank use in the UK? Answering this research question is something of a challenge. There is no official data on food bank use – although the Trussell Trust does collect data on the numbers using their network, alongside reasons for referral – and no systematic evidence base telling us why people are referred for support.

Osborne's personal tax summaries are not transparent: they don't break down welfare spending

This blog first appeared on The Staggers rolling politics blog on the New Statesman.

At CPAG, we slept on yesterday’s news of George Osborne’s personal tax summaries. This morning, we awoke to find we’re still pretty annoyed. This blog is an attempt to figure out why, exactly.