CPAG Blog

First thoughts on the ‘National Living Wage’


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A substantial increase in the National Minimum Wage for over-25s (or National Living Wage, as Osborne’s re-badging has it) can only be a good thing for low-paid workers. It should be celebrated. That much, at least, is clear.

Don’t let tax credit changes freeze mums out of work


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What's the point of working tax credits? David Cameron has called their use into question by highlighting the role they play in enabling big businesses to get away with paying poverty wages. But this overlooks the important role that working tax credits play in enabling parents to enter or stay in the labour market working less than full-time.

While the government officially abolishes child poverty, things are getting worse


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If the Government goes ahead with its plans to redefine child poverty then it will be turning its backs on poor children and on the past.

No redefinition can hide the reality that the Government’s child poverty strategy is failing.  It was only a year ago that Iain Duncan Smith was claiming the child poverty targets would be met but last week’s child poverty statistics showed that absolute child poverty has risen by half a million since 2010 and that progress on relative poverty has stalled.

London: our child poverty capital


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The child poverty figures released yesterday once again showed London still tops the league table of high child poverty rates but, more strikingly, highlighted the growing impact housing costs are having on poverty in the capital.

Poverty figures: what they do and don’t say


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Today the government released the latest official poverty statistics (for 2013-14). Anyone aware of the projections made by the IFS and the NPI think tanks may be feeling slightly confused that, essentially, child poverty rates haven’t shifted on the previous year (although half a million more children are in absolute poverty than in 2010).

We can do so much better on child poverty


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‘A strong society means moving forward together, no one left behind, fighting relative poverty a central policy goal.’ Well, Child Poverty Action Group would say that, wouldn’t they? In fact, these are the words of David Cameron, less than a decade ago, a day on which he also proclaimed: ‘I want this message to go out loud and clear: the Conservative party recognises, will measure and will act on relative poverty’.

Moving the goalposts on child poverty?

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Moving the goalposts on child poverty

Official figures due out tomorrow are projected to show a rise in child poverty – a trend independent experts suggest may continue over the next five years, as we move further and further away from the Government’s legal target to eliminate child poverty by 2020.

David Cameron's attempts to move the goalposts on poverty are a disaster - but don't take my word for it


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The failure of the Government’s child poverty approach must not be compounded by moving the goalposts.You can't define away poverty - and David Cameron himself has admitted that.

What we didn’t talk about in the election


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We really are living in the age of the permanent campaign. The general election was just weeks ago, but the main parties and political commentators have moved on and are looking at events through the lens of the 2020 election. Before that happens, it’s worth noting something pretty peculiar about the 2015 campaign.

Child benefit and the fight against poverty


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Child benefit is one of the strongest tools we have in reducing poverty, and it is vital that it is protected. But it can’t do the job on its own. We urgently need a comprehensive, action-focused strategy for reducing and then ending child poverty. The road ahead is long, and so we must start by protecting what we already have.